General

Deworming Delusions and the flimsiness of ‘evidence-based policy’

Duncan Green - July 28, 2016

This post is co-authored with Mohga Kamal-Yanni (right) Should I blog about things that are way over my head? Well it’s never stopped me in the past…… My LSE colleague Tim Allen, along with Melissa Parker and Katja Polman have edited an issue of the Journal of Biosocial Science on ‘Biosocial Approaches to the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases’. It’s open access and worth a skim, …

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The World Bank is having a big internal debate about Power and Governance. Here’s why it matters.

Duncan Green - July 26, 2016

Writing flagship publications in large institutions is a tough job. Everyone wants a piece, as different currents of opinion, ideology or interest slug it out over red lines and key messages. Trying (and failing) to write one for Oxfam once put me in hospital. So no surprise that the flagship of flagships, the World Bank’s annual World Development Report, on Governance and Law, is currently …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - July 25, 2016

How was your week? Write any top emails?  Internal Oxfam stuff, but important. Winnie Byanyima explains reasoning behind relocating Oxfam International’s office to Nairobi Ten facts about conflict and its impact on women [h/t Emily Brown] DFID has a new, high profile and v thoughtful Minister of State in Rory Stewart. Here he is on why democracy matters ‘End this report writing madness now’. Enjoyable …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - July 18, 2016

Girls’ adolescence as critical juncture, c/o World Economic Forum Great bluffer’s guide for techno-phobes and -philes alike. The top 10 emerging technologies of 2016. ‘Organs on Chips’? Prepare to be astonished. Men are more likely to cite their own research than women and the gender self-promotion gap is rising. Africa is moving toward a massive and important free trade agreement – Africa’s Continental Free Trade …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - July 4, 2016

The whole Fragile States discussion came a lot closer to home last week (power vacuums, formal v informal power, unstable leadership, fragmented patronage-based party systems, even the role of elite boarding schools……). Why oh why did the Remain campaign reject this poster? We deserve an answer. As a public service, Buzzfeed has pulled together all the best Brexit tweets of the last week. They are …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - June 27, 2016

Blimey, where to start? Think I’ll do an initial ‘how change happens’ post mortem piece on Brexit tomorrow, and just stick to the pre-poll run-up today, because the final days of the EU referendum campaign produced some fine humour – it already seems like a bygone age. Rhodri Marsden belatedly took a leaf out of the Leave campaign’s approach to factiness. And should his political fortunes prosper, let’s …

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Why do people flee their homes? The answers may surprise you

Duncan Green - June 21, 2016

Yesterday was World Refugee Day and a new UN report put the total number of ‘forcibly displaced’ at 65.3 million. Most of those remained within national boundaries (internally displaced). Oxfam researcher John Magrath summarizes a recent study on the causes of internal displacement Why do people become displaced? That is, forcibly displaced in that they have, or believe they have, no other choice but to …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - June 20, 2016

Never has ‘links I liked’ been more of a misnomer, but I have to start with the murder of my former colleague Jo Cox. This was one of the more searching reflections on her death. Which leads us on to this week’s EU Referendum, I guess. If you’re one of those diminishing band of voters that is still interested in facty stuff, the Institute for …

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RIP Jo Cox

Duncan Green - June 17, 2016

I worked with Jo (Jo Leadbeater as she then was) for several years at Oxfam, where she ended up being head of the advocacy team in Oxfam GB. My main memory is of her relentless optimism and tigerish energy – she bounced around the office. She was an activist’s activist (we didn’t always see eye to eye – she once memorably dismissed my role as …

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