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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - November 13, 2017

Huge thanks to everyone at Oxfam Canada, its Executive Director Julie Delahanty and the splendid Shirley Pryce (here’s the three of us) for making last week’s tour such fun, even though they made me dance onto the stage to Bob Marley’s ‘Stand up for your Rights’, get up at 4am in minus 20 degrees and wear OTT shirts. Burundi ordered all unwed couples to marry by …

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What kind of evidence might persuade people to change their minds on refugees?

Duncan Green - November 7, 2017

Oxfam Humanitarian Policy Adviser Ed Cairns reflects on using evidence to influence the treatment of refugees Who thinks that governments decide what to do on refugees after carefully considering the evidence? Not many, I suspect. So it was an interesting to be asked to talk about that at the  ‘Evidence for Influencing’ conference Duncan wrote about last week. When I think what influences refugee policy, …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - November 6, 2017

The power of league tables to incentivise behaviour change (see right). If you’re in Canada, check out this week’s speaking tour (me + Shirley Pryce, President of the Jamaica Household Workers Union (JHWU), Julie Delahanty, Executive Director of Oxfam Canada, and local women’s rights activists) Find Out Some (But Not All) The Secrets of China’s Foreign Aid The reverse advent calendar. One item per day in a …

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Is there a new Washington Consensus? An analysis of five World Development Reports.

Duncan Green - November 3, 2017

Alice Evans earns my undying admiration (and ubergeek status) by casually revealing that she has read the last 5 WDRs on the day of their publication. Here she summarizes what they show about the Bank’s evolving view of the world. A new Washington Consensus is emerging… It recognises complexity, context, learning by doing, politics, and ideas. Hitherto fringe perspectives have become mainstream – embraced by …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - October 31, 2017

The rich are getting richer; the poor not so much. Japan, South Korea are the exceptions. H/t The Economist Last week was ‘Open Access Week’ and there’s some good news: The number and proportion of freely available articles is growing; reaching 45% of the literature published in 2015 Influencing for social justice: nudge, shove, show or shout? New Oxfam blog series on advocacy Brilliant from …

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Is it time to get personal on tax dodging?

Duncan Green - October 30, 2017

The people who read this blog tend to be rationalists and progressive, so they won’t need much convincing that tax avoidance is a big (and lethal) deal. Oxfam calculates that just a third of the $100bn [approx. £78bn] tax that companies dodge in poor countries annually is enough to cover the bill for essential healthcare (vaccinations, midwives and diarrhoea treatment) that could prevent the needless …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - October 23, 2017

By 2022, the number of young people in middle/low-income countries who are obese will overtake the number who are underweight (with big impact on health budgets and wellbeing). Time for Oxfat? George Soros gives $18bn to his charitable foundation Magisterial Branko Milanovic summary of what we know from the latest data on global inequality. More positive than his famous elephant graph. Great collection of posts …

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This Week in Africa: an amazing weekly links round-up

Duncan Green - October 21, 2017

If you’re interested in more or less anything to do with Africa, check out ‘The Week in Africa’, an extraordinarily comprehensive round up of links by weekly email, put together by Jeff (American) and Phil (Zimbabwean) and hosted by the University of San Francicso. Sign up here. Here’s this week’s bulletin: QUOTE OF THE WEEK “We have never seen such devastation. Not even in our …

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What did I learn from a day with the UN’s bloggers?

Duncan Green - October 20, 2017

Had a fun day earlier this week running a blogging workshop for Unicef researchers in their wonderful centre in Florence (I know, tough gig etc). I ran through what is rapidly becoming my standard powerpoint (here you go, feel free to steal or comment), but the most interesting (and exhausting) session was working through nine draft blogs with their authors in a group: it was …

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