General

See you in September

Duncan Green - August 25, 2016

I’m off to the Edinburgh fringe to direct a cultural firehose onto my parched hinterland, followed by 10 days in Myanmar, where, among other things, I will finally find out the correct adjective – Burmese? Not sure when I will be blogging next, so until then, here’s a pic of each.

Continue reading

Links I Liked

Duncan Green - August 22, 2016

Invaluable tips for managers who need to wing the next meeting. Smart idea. Using house prices in Egypt to identify the richest, who are routinely missed by household surveys and tax receipts. Result? Egyptian inequality higher than we thought Those who read more than 3.5 hours weekly survive almost two years longer than those who didn’t crack open a book (blogs don’t count, sorry). [h/t …

Continue reading

How do developing country decision makers rate aid donors?

Duncan Green - August 19, 2016

Had a last minute cancellation of today’s post – ah Oxfam sign off, doncha love it? So here’s the most read new post from the last year. Brilliant. Someone’s finally done it. For years I’ve been moaning on about how no-one ever asks developing country governments to assess aid donors (rather than the other way around), and then publishes a league table of the good, the …

Continue reading

Links I Liked

Duncan Green - August 15, 2016

Olympics slot: Simones rock (Biles and Manuel) If you like a nice Cork accent, listen up to Ireland’s O’Donovan brothers in the rowing (they ended up winning silver) Brilliant Dani Rodrik piece questioning the demands for global governance: he thinks we should be sceptical, except where truly global public goods are at stake (eg climate change), but elsewhere it can do more harm than good Six steps for academics …

Continue reading

Is this the right moment to reboot the Aid, Trade and Private Sector agenda?

Duncan Green - August 12, 2016

Oxfam’s private sector adviser Erinch Sahan thinks the times are ripe for a paradigm shift  In a former life (i.e. six years ago), I worked as a development adviser to Australia’s trade negotiators. Back then, we development types were suspicious and hostile – we feared that rich countries would divert aid to pursue a narrow interpretation of their national interests. Now, from TPP to the UK’s …

Continue reading

Links I Liked

Duncan Green - August 8, 2016

Top billboard, top hashtag – #ActualMuslims set the record straight in Chicago [h/t Hussain Khamani] What’s to be done with Oxfam? Thoughtful reflection on the current state of existential self-questioning in the INGOs. Uwe Gneiting of Oxfam America responds. Fascinating. 10 Africans from all walks of life describe their digital days Excellent piece on power of networked campaigning [h/t Jamie Pett] Why not actually draw …

Continue reading

How do you make aid programmes truly adaptive? New lessons from Bangladesh and Cambodia

Duncan Green - August 5, 2016

Following on from yesterday’s post on adaptive aid, a guest piece from Lisa Denney (left), Daniel Harris (middle)and Leni Wild (right), all of ODI (sorry layout’s gone so weird – it’s cos there’s so many of them…..) A swelling chorus of the development community has been advocating for more flexible and adaptive programming that can respond to the twists and turns of political reform processes. They argue that in order …

Continue reading

What explains advocacy success in setting global agendas? Comparing Tobacco v Alcohol and four other Global Advocacy Efforts

Duncan Green - August 3, 2016

Oxfam researcher/evaluation adviser Uwe Gneiting introduces a new set of case studies It’s an age-old puzzle – why do some advocacy and campaigning efforts manage to influence the political agendas of governments, international institutions and corporations but others don’t? What explains the difference in attention, resource mobilization and policy traction of some issues (e.g. anti-Apartheid, HIV/AIDS) compared to others (e.g. the limited success of gun control …

Continue reading

Links I Liked

Duncan Green - August 1, 2016

By the way, I’m heading for the US East Coast (DC, NYC, Boston) to launch How Change Happens from 28th Nov to 10th Dec. If you are interested in organizing an event, please get in touch. The new Fortune Global 500 is out. 3 of the top 4 companies are Chinese. ‘All these theories – counterinsurgency warfare, state building – were actually complete abstract madness. …

Continue reading

Deworming Delusions and the flimsiness of ‘evidence-based policy’

Duncan Green - July 28, 2016

This post is co-authored with Mohga Kamal-Yanni (right) Should I blog about things that are way over my head? Well it’s never stopped me in the past…… My LSE colleague Tim Allen, along with Melissa Parker and Katja Polman have edited an issue of the Journal of Biosocial Science on ‘Biosocial Approaches to the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases’. It’s open access and worth a skim, …

Continue reading
Translate »