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Duncan Green - September 25, 2017

Nice cup of Nambian covfefe anyone? Ht Calestous Juma Clickbait and impact: how academia has been hacked, Nice piece on THAT ‘in praise of colonialism’ Third World Quarterly paper Strategic litigation is getting going on climate change: San Franciso becomes the 1st major U.S. city to sue the fossil fuel industry for knowingly causing it. How I lost my past. Beautiful and poignant exploration of …

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Two top authors compared: Hossain on Bangladesh and Ang on China

Duncan Green - September 21, 2017

OK, so this week I’ve reviewed the two important new books on the rise of China and Bangladesh. Now for the tricky bit – the comparison. The books are very different in their approach. Where Yuen Yuen Ang focuses on the ‘how’ in China, Naomi Hossain is more interested in the ‘why’ in Bangladesh. Hossain traces the ‘why’ to the critical junctures that littered Bangladeshi’s …

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Duncan Green - September 18, 2017

Handy acronyms for online reviews (h/t Shit Academics Say)  The awesome Gates Foundation lobby machine went into overdrive to defend aid budgets last week, with a report on past progress in 18 areas now in peril, Bill in the Guardian saying they are lobbying Congress rather than wasting breath on the President and Melinda talking to the FT (video) Owen Barder kept us up to …

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Duncan Green - September 11, 2017

Shock revelation – our kids are ‘Anarcho-Communists’ ‘We need no more marchers. We need more mayors’. Great reflection/book review by Nathan Heller on modern protest Bollywood’s hot new topics: open toilets, menstrual hygiene and erectile dysfunction What Guatemala’s political crisis means for anti-corruption efforts everywhere. Backgrounder on UN’s ground-breaking work in Central America Oh dear. Giving Danish politicians more evidence makes their decision-making worse, not …

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From Starving Greece in 1942 to Yemen and Nigeria in 2017: Why Total War is still Wrong

Duncan Green - September 6, 2017

Ed Cairns worries that, 75 years since Oxfam was founded, we have returned to an era of heartless total war When a group of people met in Oxford’s University Church on 5 October 1942, they talked about the dire shortage of food in Nazi-occupied countries, and how to raise money and get relief through the Allies’ blockade. They agreed to set up something called the …

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Duncan Green - September 4, 2017

What did foreigners ever do for us? Hamburg Supermarket Edeka decided to remove all foreign items from its shelves to make a point about xenophobia ht Sony Kapoor Is it possible to calculate the return on investment for a research policy project? Here’s one attempt in Indonesia Robin Hood had the right idea: Stephany Griffith-Jones on why the left needs to deliver on the financial …

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What researchers say v what they mean

Duncan Green - August 10, 2017

This handy translation device from Claire Hutchings is reminiscent of an FP2P all time favourite ‘what Brits say v what they mean’. On the left, what they say; on the right, what they mean. Enjoy (and send me other similar exercises). And with that, I’m heading off on holiday – two weeks in the Scottish rain, including a week replenishing my parched hinterland at the …

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Duncan Green - August 7, 2017

Geeks Franziska Mager and David Evans contributed their favourite cartoons about control groups (really) ‘Information does not lead to political accountability’. Important null result from some serious research raises big questions for transparency activists Best of luck to USAID’s new boss, Mark Green (no relation). Here’s a handy briefing for him on why the aid budget matters and a nice example of what his agency …

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Looks like the NGOs are stepping up on ‘Doing Development Differently’. Good.

Duncan Green - August 4, 2017

For several years I’ve been filling the ‘token NGO’ slot at a series of meetings about ‘doing development differently’ (DDD) and/or ‘thinking and working politically’ – networks largely dominated by official aid donors, academics, thinktanks and management consultants (good overview of all the different initiatives here). Periodically, a range of NGOs appear on the scene, and according to ODI and Care are doing plenty on …

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Duncan Green - July 31, 2017

Washington’s corridors of power are looking empty in Donald Trump’s unfilled government: according to The Economist, ‘His lethargy, not Democratic obstinacy, is to blame’. Finding positive outliers on anti-corruption is surprisingly hard, because everyone disputes success stories. Brilliant from Caryn Pfeiffer What do India’s poor have to say about poverty and aid? First of an annual 10 country ‘Voices of the Poor’ exercise by Globescan …

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