What can political economists tell us about Africa, aid and development?

June 11, 2012

Can environment and development really come together next week in Rio?

June 11, 2012

How not to write about Africa; parents like conditions; see inequality from space; growth stars; financial arms races; Rio+20 draft text; Family Planning Summit: links I liked

June 11, 2012
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How not to write about Africa in 2012, a beginner’s guide, blisteringly written by Binyavanga Wainaina.

Nice. An experiment in Brazil suggests 82% of parents like the ‘conditional’ in ‘conditional cash transfers’ because it helps them make their kids go to school. They even turned down the offer of a (slightly) larger unconditional cash transfer instead. Rings true.

How to detect income inequality from space – follow the trees.  [h/t Rob Nash]income-inequality1

Who are the growth stars of the last decade? The % growth table (winner Equatorial Guinea, China 5th, Ethiopia 19th) looks nothing like the absolute table (how many $ have been added – winner Macao, China 65th, Ethiopia 154th). Development Impacts compares the two, and which one is most relevant on particular issues.

Exquisitely written speech (‘the sleek have inherited the earth’) by Andrew Haldane of the Bank of England on 3 ‘financial arms races’ (races on returns, speed and towards safety) and how to manage them. Hope someone’s listening. [h/t Rob Nash]

For communiqué junkies everywhere – you connoisseurs of square brackets and shall v should, revel in the leaked draft text for Rio + 20.

Inspired by the gorgeous ‘Scale of the Universe’ timesuck infographic, Bill Easterly’s crew have come up with ‘the Universe of Development’ from $1.25 a day to EU GDP ($17.6 trillion and falling…..). Bit clunky and no astral music, but still worth a look.  

Melinda Gates makes the case for universal access to contraception, ahead of the Family Planning Summit in London on 11 July, (her foundation is hosting with DFID)

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