Why is so little being done to stop traffic killing 1.25m people per year, and costing 3% of global GDP? Good new paper.

May 5, 2017

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May 5, 2017

Life in a time of Food Price Volatility: 4 years of research in a 4 page infographic

May 5, 2017
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IDS and Oxfam have put together a snazzy infographic/executive summary of their four year research project, with links to the main documents for those old fashioned enough to want to read something. What do you think of the format?

Precarious lives_online summary_master_Page_1Precarious lives_online summary_master_Page_2Precarious lives_online summary_master_Page_3Precarious lives_online summary_master_Page_4

3 comments

  1. Sorry, but after going through the infographic I have no idea “make it possible for citizens to have a control over what and how they eat.”
    The action that seems to be advocated is “click the ‘policy recommendations’ button”

    1. Hi Steven,

      Duncan shared your comment with me since I am the “chief architect”, if you like, behind this infographic, which draws findings from a 4 year research collaboration between IDS, Oxfam and a number of partners in the 10 countries we were investigating.

      I hope I can address your points, although as I do, I must admit that I was not entirely clear what you meant by “make it possible for citizens to have a control over what and how they eat.”

      Here goes: the research highlighted how, in difficult circumstances such as massive spikes in food prices, people will make choices around what they eat, not just based on what they can afford, but on a range of other factors such as the fact that they need to find more work to pay for the food, so have less time to prepare food, so more inclined to buy convenience foods etc. And whilst there are constraints, there also opportunities, for example around social status. So it’s important that those working on policies and programmes relating to health, nutrition, social protection, etc., do not simply take a narrow technocratic focus looking at supply e.g. rolling out a major flour fortification programme since it may be that people can no longer afford to buy and eat that flour, or they can eat it but have not time to prepare foods using it, or they do not have access to a kitchen in which they can prepare foods using that flour,etc.

      We are inviting people working in this area to shift their focus to “demand” and the choices people make, and how these choices are constrained (or increased) as they become more integrated into markets.

      In terms of the main actions advocated, these are listed at the end as
      *Protect access to good food
      *Insulate people against price shocks
      *Protect people against precarious labour

      I hope this makes sense? It would be good to hear your thoughts and your own experience in this area.
      But since this is an interactive infographic, one of the calls to action is indeed to encourage readers to click on our Policy Recommendations, or indeed the full research report, since this provides much more nuanced and in-depth detail on the picture we are trying to paint about trends that may be here to stay following the global food crisis.

  2. Hi Duncan & Oxfam / IDS research team,

    I just wanted to say thank you for providing a perfect example of how to use multiple mediums for effective communication – the combination of infographics, photographs, video, design elements, quotes from researchers, field stories, policy recommendations, and full research reports was just the example I needed to share with my team as we think about good communication practises.

    Thank you and well done!

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