It’s International Men’s Day tomorrow – here’s why it’s a bad idea

November 21, 2016

Where has the Doing Development Differently movement got to, two years on?

November 21, 2016

Links I Liked

November 21, 2016
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Tis the season to be evil? A fitting end to 2016 – bring the kidssatan

Next week (starting 28th Nov) I’ll be pestering the US about How Change Happens (actually, I think they might already be wondering about that). Events in Washington DC, New York and Boston. Will try and get a list of event links up on the book website in the next couple of days.

My twitter feed has been crammed with some musings on the deeper significance of /what happens next after the US elections. Some of my favourites have been Sina Odugbemi, in the custody of angst, Kieran Breen on Hypernormalisation and building a global movement for change, Robert Skidelsky on whether this is a 1914 moment and how to avoid what followed and Shashi Tharoor on the end (or at least decline) of US soft power. Bill Easterly reckons it’s time to end the alliance of the War on Poverty with the War on Terror (hard to argue with that). While Jonathan Glennie concludes that after Brexit and Trump, the aid and development sector must pay more attention to domestic (i.e. northern) issues.

What else should I be reading on the ‘how change happens’ of the US elections, on my plane this weekend? Advice welcome

Meanwhile, in these angst-ridden times, how about some good news?

“The number of people in extreme poverty fell by 130,000 since yesterday” should have been the headline every single day in the last 2 decades.

Scandinavia fines people for traffic violations according to their incomes, so Reima Kuisla, a Finnish businessman recently had to cough up $54,000 for going at 65 miles per hour in a 50 zone. How cool is that? [h/t Max Lawson]

Proud Dad spot: props to East London Community Land Trust & its co-Director Calum Green for producing low cost homes whose price is linked to local average wages

a2m-league-tableGlobal deaths due to terrorism fell by 10% last year. Don’t suppose that will be on many front pages

And GSK tops a new Big Pharma league table on access to medicines in developing countries

5 comments

  1. Scandinavia fines people for traffic violations according to their incomes, so Reima Kuisla, a Finnish businessman recently had to cough up $54,000 for going at 65 miles per hour in a 50 zone. How cool is that? [h/t Max Lawson]

    Switzerland applies the same. Few years ago someone in a similar situation was fined about USD 250,000.

  2. Here is a podcast for geeks on Trump, polling and ‘epistemic humility’.

    ” “How did we get it so wrong?” No sooner had Donald Trump declared victory in the U.S. Presidential contest, than political journalists, pundits and opinionators-for-hire began agonising over why they had not seen it coming. Explanations abound, from the theory of the “shy conservative” (who won’t publicly admit their support of unpopular candidates) to the utter inefficacy of modern journalism itself. Perhaps there is another, deeper explanation: that each of these events points to a crisis of epistemology – that is, of what we (can) know and how we (can) know it. After all, there is a particular type of knowledge that undergirds modern political discourse: call it positivism. It is knowledge as quantifiable, verifiable, disprovable, transmissible, usable.

    But in our sophisticated, data-driven times, have we thereby forgotten there are other ways of knowing? That the work of politics and the task of achieving a common life cannot be so reduced to sterile units of measurement or impersonal formulae?”

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/theminefield/does-trump%E2%80%99s-victory-signal-an-epistemological-crisis/8028088

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