climate change

What’s changed since Copenhagen? Curtain raiser for the Paris climate talks  

Duncan Green - November 25, 2015

Tracy Carty, Oxfam Climate Change Policy Adviser, with an excerpt from its Paris media briefing, published today The last time leaders got together to agree a global climate deal it ended in multilateral meltdown.  Copenhagen was widely condemned as a failure – a failure that still haunts the climate negotiations, and one that governments meeting in Paris next week will not want to repeat. Six …

Continue reading

Why being scooped by Piketty is no bad thing for Oxfam (but what will the government of India think?)

Duncan Green - November 13, 2015

Guest post from Tim Gore, Oxfam’s climate change policy czar  No-one likes to be scooped, least of all researchers who have battled through Oxfam’s internal sign-off process. But when the authors who beat you to the publication punch include one of the most famous economists in the world – as we experienced last week – we can at least be reassured that our analysis is …

Continue reading

A big win for climate change campaigners in the Philippines – how did they do it?

Duncan Green - November 11, 2015

Some great news from the Philippines. The Philippines Survival Fund, which I blogged about a couple of years ago, is finally open for business – local governments and community organizations will now be apply to apply for funds up to 1 billion pesos (US$21m) a year, for projects that help communities adapt to climate change. The first lesson is the need for stamina – even …

Continue reading

What happens when historians and campaigners spend a day together discussing how change happens?

Duncan Green - June 9, 2015

Part of the feedback on last month’s post calling for a ‘lessons of history’ programme was, inevitably, that someone is already doing it. So last week I headed off to Kings College, London for a mind expanding conference on ‘Why Change Happens: What we Can Learn from the Past’. The organizers were the History and Policy network and Friends of the Earth, as part of …

Continue reading

How can Faith Groups get better at campaigning on climate change?

Duncan Green - November 7, 2014

On Monday, I had not two fascinating big picture conversations under Chatham House Rules – these are a gift to bloggers as you don’t have to remember who said what,  and can take all the credit for anything clever. I’ve already blogged the discussion on theories of change and the Middle East. The second was run by a faith-based NGO in the middle of a …

Continue reading

Why campaigning on fossil fuels is not just Greenpeace’s job, and how the development community needs to get it right

Duncan Green - October 31, 2014

Guest post from Hannah Stoddart, currently managing Oxfam’s advocacy and influencing in Rwanda (but normally Head of Policy, Food and Climate Justice at Oxfam GB) Last week Oxfam launched its first ever report condemning the fossil fuel industry as the main barrier to action on climate change. Oxfam joins a growing movement that recognises that tackling the power of the fossil fuel industry – its …

Continue reading

After New York, how should climate change campaigners approach Paris? (aka Naomi Klein vs the New Climate Economy)

Duncan Green - September 26, 2014

Oxfam head of policy for food and climate change Tim Gore reflects on what happens next after the euphoria of New York (and asks you to vote, right) First, the good news. After the Copenhagen hangover, the international climate change movement is back. Over recent days in New York, we’ve seen the emergence of a new people’s climate movement, broader than anything that has gone …

Continue reading

Amartya Sen on dangers of climate change ‘obsession’ and nuclear power and need for a new ethics of environmentalism

Duncan Green - September 4, 2014

Amartya Sen has an important piece out in the New Republic magazine, on the links between environment and development. It’s quite long, so I thought I’d offer my precis service. He argues that the attention to climate change is disproportionate, not because we should think less about it, but because we should worry a lot more about other environmental issues, particularly poor people’s access to …

Continue reading

How can politics change to serve future generations (on climate change, but lots of other stuff too)?

Duncan Green - July 24, 2014

No-one objected to yesterday’s rehash of a recent BS (blue sky, OK?) session, so here’s another. An hour in a cool café in Brixton market with Kiwi academic Jonathan Boston, wrestling with the really big question on climate change and the survival of our species: how could political institutions emerge that govern for future generations? Jonathan, who used to run the Institute for Governance and …

Continue reading

Please steal these killer facts: a crib sheet for advocacy on aid, development, inequality etc

Duncan Green - July 1, 2014

Regular FP2P readers will be heartily sick of used to me banging on about the importance of ‘killer facts‘ in NGO advocacy and general communications. Recently, I was asked to work with some of our finest policy wonks to put together some crib sheets for Oxfam’s big cheeses, who are more than happy for me to spread the love to you lot. So here are some …

Continue reading
Translate »