food prices

Help yourself: How do poor women and men understand their right to food?

Duncan Green - June 5, 2014

Naomi Hossain of IDS introduces the latest report (launched today) from a joint IDS/Oxfam research programme on food prices. Do people at risk of hunger think they have a right to food? What does a right to food mean, and how can it be claimed and enforced? We asked these questions of around 1500 people in our Life in a Time of Food Price Volatility research …

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Creating a splash with Data Diving

admin - August 30, 2013

Over a July weekend in London four charities and more than 80 data professionals took part in a “DataDive”, organized by DataKind UK. Ricardo, Richard and Simone from Oxfam’s Research Team (see pic of handsome hunks below) went along. Here’s what happened. If you came to London for a weekend during the best summer since 1976, how would you like to spend your time? Inside, …

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‘Squeezed': how are poor people adjusting to life in a time of food price volatility?

admin - May 23, 2013

Ace IDS researcher Naomi Hossain introduces the first results of a big Oxfam/IDS research project on food price volatility If the point of development is to make the Third World more like the First, then we aid-wallahs can pack our bags and go home. Job done. The most striking finding of Squeezed, the first year results from the four year Life in a Time of …

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If we can’t prove that speculation drives food prices, should we regulate it anyway?

admin - March 1, 2013

One of my more wonk-mind-blowing moments last year was refereeing a debate about financial speculation and commodity prices between Oxfam’s Rob Nash and a UK Treasury wonk who wished to remain nameless. I couldn’t understand either of them (even by international development standards, the language is really weird – try ‘contango’ or ‘backwardation’).  I tried to get them to slug it out on the blog, …

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What’s New in Development? Introducing the Second Edition of ‘From Poverty to Power’

admin - January 10, 2013

Here’s what the new edition of FP2P adds to the first (in case you want to save yourselves a few quid). This was recently published by the UN University as part of its ‘WIDER Angle’ series Updating a book on contemporary events can be unnerving. In the intervening years, events and new thinking combine to expose theweaknesses of any text. Even more so with a …

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Prices that bounce – Naomi Hossain on the human face of the food crisis

admin - September 14, 2012

Oxfam and IDS are starting work on Life in a Time of Food Price Volatility, a 4 year project combining qualitative and quantitative methods to track the human impact in communities in 10 countries, building on the methodology behind our 2011 report, Living on a Spike. Richard King at Oxfam and Naomi Hossain at IDS are running the project. Here, Naomi (right) reports back on …

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Extreme weather, extreme prices: what will more erratic weather do to food prices?

admin - September 5, 2012

Oxfam Climate Change Policy Adviser Tracy Carty summarizes her new paper, published today With greenhouse gas emissions at an all time high, and the world lurching towards a third food price spike in four years following the worst US drought since the 1950s, there is an alarming gap in our knowledge – how will an increase in extreme weather caused by climate change affect future …

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How poor people get through crises: some excellent 'rapid social anthropology' from IDS and the World Bank

admin - April 19, 2012

On Wednesday, I spoke at the launch of a new book, Living Through Crises: How the Food, Fuel and Financial Shocks Affect the Poor, by Rasmus Heltberg, Naomi Hossain and Anna Reva. It’s a joint World Bank and IDS publication, also available for free online. I think it could prove quite influential. The starting point for the book is that we live in a world …

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Food and Finance: a little less speculation, a little more action please…

admin - October 5, 2011

Some good sense on a polarised topic from Ruth Kelly, Oxfam economic policy adviser and co-author of a new paper on speculation and food prices. When they work properly, financial markets are great at greasing the cogs of the food system. Why, then, are so many people blaming speculation for recent food price spikes?   First here’s how markets ought to work. People all along …

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