governance

What can historical success teach us about tackling sanitation and hygiene?

Duncan Green - April 1, 2016

Ooh good, another ‘lessons of history’ research piece. Check out the excellent new WaterAid report: Achieving total sanitation and hygiene coverage within a generation – lessons from East Asia. The paper summarizes the findings of four country case studies: Singapore, South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand, all of which produced ‘rapid and remarkable results in delivering total sanitation coverage in their formative stages as nation states’. …

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The art of delivery – lessons from working with African governments

Duncan Green - March 2, 2016

Dan Hymowitz (@dhymowit), Acting Director of Development and External Relations for the Africa Governance Initiative (AGI), reflects on what they’re learning about the development trend of ‘delivery’. I remember the first time I started to think seriously about delivery: it was just over five years ago sitting in a conference room in Liberia. At the time, I was working with the Liberian Presidency and was …

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Trying to promote reform in fragile and conflict states: some lessons from success and failure

Duncan Green - February 25, 2016

Reading the ODI’s prodigious output is starting to feel like a full time job. A lot of it is really top quality, even if their choice of titles is sometimes a bit bland. One example is ‘Change in Challenging Contexts’, a name that doesn’t exactly set the pulse racing – a shame, as it’s a fascinating set of papers. The papers (a 54 page whopper, …

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Doing Problem Driven Work, great new guide for governance reformers and activists

Duncan Green - February 24, 2016

One of the criticisms of the big picture discussion on governance  that’s been going on in networks such as Doing Development Differently and Thinking and Working Politically is that it’s all very helicopter-ish. ‘What do I do differently on Monday morning?’, comes the frustrated cry of the practitioner. Now some really useful answers are starting to come onstream, and I’ll review a few of them. …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - November 2, 2015

In 1800 there was no country with a life expectancy over 40. Please excuse the self promotion, but if you’re in Washington Weds, please come along to discuss How Change Happens at CGD. Put the draft book up on Friday, and the first review went up same day – not that’s what I call fast feedback. Has the governance agenda lost its mojo? The wonderful …

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Why those promoting growth need to take politics seriously, and vice versa

Duncan Green - October 14, 2015

Nicholas Waddell, a DFID Governance Adviser working on ‘Governance for Economic Development’ (G4ED) explores the links between governance and economic growth.  Should I play it safe and join a governance team or risk being a lone voice in a sea of economists and private sector staff? This was my dilemma as a DFID Governance Adviser returning to the UK after a stint in East Africa. …

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What are governance advisers missing with ‘Political Economy Analysis’? How can they do better?

Duncan Green - October 8, 2015

From a restaurant in Jakarta, David Hudson & Heather Marquette with some new thinking on power, politics and governance What advice would you give to a novice governance advisor working for a bilateral donor going into the field for the first time? Want to know how some of the top governance experts, advisors, researchers and academics would say? Well, wonder no more. In a welcome …

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Reforming FIFA: what can we learn from experience with (other) corrupt autocrats?

Duncan Green - June 11, 2015

This guestie comes from Birmingham University’s Paul Jackson and Heather Marquette Acres (how many football pitches-worth, we wonder) have been written about the footballing earthquake that followed the arrest of several FIFA officials and the melodramatic end of Sepp Blatter’s reign. But here’s another angle. In the world of development politics there are striking parallels between Blatter’s leadership of FIFA since 1998 and the modus operandi …

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What would persuade the aid business to ‘think and work politically’?

Duncan Green - March 4, 2015

Some wonks from the ‘thinking and working politically’ (TWP) network discussed its influencing strategy last week. There were some people with proper jobs there, who demanded Chatham House Rules, which happily means I don’t have to remember who said what (or credit anyone). The discussion was interesting because it covered ground relevant to almost anyone trying to shift an internal consensus (in this case towards …

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