What are governments doing on inequality? Great new cross-country data (and some important conclusions) from Nora Lustig

Duncan Green - January 28, 2015

Oxfam and Oxford University held a big inequality conference last week, timed to coincide with Davos and the launch of our new pre Davosbriefing (massive media coverage – kudos to author Deborah Hardoon and Oxfam press team). I generally find conferences pretty disturbing. This one at least spared us the coma-inducing panels of nervous researchers reading out their papers. All the speakers were confident and convincing. …

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$2 leaving developing countries for every $1 going in – big new report on the state of global financial flows

Duncan Green - December 18, 2014

A very useful new report from Eurodad, published today, provides ‘the most comprehensive review of the quantity of different financing sources available to developing countries, and how they have changed over the past decade.’ This in the run up to the big UN summit on financing for development (FfD) in Addis Ababa in July 2015. Here are some highlights from the exec sum: ‘We have …

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Let’s all eat cake: The terrible inefficiency of inequality

Duncan Green - November 3, 2014

Alex Cobham, of the Center for Global Development (@alexcobham), welcomes Oxfam’s new inequality campaign, argues for making inequality a core part of the post-2015 framework, and comes over all French Revolution on wealth registers and cake (the eating of). International acceptance of stark economic inequalities reflects a grand political failure. A failure that locks in the wasting of human potential for generations, to say nothing of …

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Please steal these killer facts: a crib sheet for advocacy on aid, development, inequality etc

Duncan Green - July 1, 2014

Regular FP2P readers will be heartily sick of used to me banging on about the importance of ‘killer facts‘ in NGO advocacy and general communications. Recently, I was asked to work with some of our finest policy wonks to put together some crib sheets for Oxfam’s big cheeses, who are more than happy for me to spread the love to you lot. So here are some …

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How to fix fragile states? The OECD reckons it’s all down to tax systems.

Duncan Green - February 25, 2014

‘Over-generous tax exemptions awarded to multinational enterprises often deprive fragile states of potential revenues that could be used to fund their most pressing needs.’ Another broadside from rent-a-mob? Nope, it’s the ultra respectable OECD in its Fragile States 2014 report. After years of growth, aid to fragile states started to fall in 2011, so the report centres around an urgent call for OECD member states …

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Campaigning on Hot v Cold Issues – what’s the difference?

admin - July 31, 2013

I recently began an interesting conversation with our new campaigns and policy czar, Ben Phillips, who then asked me to pick the FP2P collective brain-hive for further ideas. Here goes. The issue is ‘cold’ v ‘hot’ campaigning. Over the next couple of years, we will be doing a lot of campaigning on climate change and inequality. Inequality is flavour of the month, with an avalanche …

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Doing a big Alaska: the case for a global social protection fund

admin - March 14, 2013

Olivier de Schutter, the UN’s special rapporteur on the right to food, is consistently interesting and provocative. This call to action is currently circulating on the interwebs (although the paper it’s based on came out last October): ‘If protecting human rights could be translated into a single political action, the creation of comprehensive social protection schemes would be it. Health care, unemployment insurance, food aid, …

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Is taxation better than aid for state-building? The case of Somaliland

admin - June 30, 2011

Domestic taxation is one of those absolutely crucial development issues that too often drop through the cracks. It’s important not just because, at a time of huge pressure on aid budgets, it is a vital source of ‘financing for development’, but also because taxation has been at the heart of politics and state-building, ever since the creation of nation states in Europe and the ‘no …

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Robin Hood: the long view from Ha-Joon Chang (and me)

admin - April 19, 2011

This appeared in today’s Guardian and on its Comment is Free site yesterday. CiF is notable for the number and vehemence of comments, many of them slightly unhinged. 100 comments in the first two hours is about par for the course, evoking images of lots of angry people in bedsits and offices bashing away at their keyboards. Keeps them off the streets, I suppose. Robin …

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What is happening on global bank taxes? Robin Hood reports from the frontline

admin - August 13, 2010

Earlier this year, I posted a fair amount on the new Robin Hood Tax campaign for a financial transactions tax to fund aid and the fight against climate change (start here and follow the links). In a guest blog, Oxfam’s top RHT obsessive, Max Lawson, updates us on the subsequent behind-the-scenes progress “In today’s aid-speak, Robin Hood was a pretty outcome-focussed kind of guy. He …

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