The whole shebang: is this the most amazing infographic ever?

May 8, 2012

My first week on twitter: impressions of a newbie

May 8, 2012

The global cashpoint – remittances, mobiles and the unbanked; expat disillusion; defending UNCTAD; organic v chemicals; sharing solutions: links I liked

May 8, 2012
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‘In 2011 remittances to poor countries totalled $372 billion…. In 1970 46% of recorded remittances were reckoned to originate in America. By 2010 America’s share was just 17%. One big new player is the Gulf.’ Excellent update on the rise and rise of global remittance flows (now = three times global aid flows and – unlike aid – still rising fast).

‘In Kenya, a staggering 68% of adults use mobile money (by far the highest rate in the world, partly because regulation is africa mobile bankingextremely light) [compared to] more than 40% also have ordinary bank accounts.’ But according to the Economist, high rates of mobile banking extend far beyond East Africa (see map – the darkest shade means over 40% of people have used mobile banking).

And the World Bank’s Findex project has released an avalanche of data on ‘the unbanked’, summarized in a nice infographic. Plus interesting comparison by Jonathan Morduch between the Bank’s Big Data exercise with the findings of the epic Portfolios of the Poor micro study.

The ‘aid bitchslap’, (and some pretty bad aid, by the sound of it). The frustrations and miseries of an expat in Haiti.

Carlos Fortin and Martin Khor celebrate success (or at least a draw) in the battle of UNCTAD

Don’t pack away those fertilizers just yet. A comprehensive review of research on organic v chemical agriculture concludes that organic yields are significantly lower, although it varies a lot by crops (strawberries and soybeans do better).

Solution to world hunger? Ask the kids – sweet. [h/t Alex Evans]

3 comments

  1. Duncan, My research suggests that the way the use of mobile money transfer services is being referred to as mobile “banking” leads to much misinterpretation of what is really going on. It suggests these services are substituting for banks. In Kenya it can be argued that they are in fact making the informal sector more efficient – ie inter-personal transfers which enable people to more or less bank with each other! You might like to take a look at a couple of blogposts on the issue.
    CGAP blogpost:
    http://technology.cgap.org/2012/04/19/what-does-the-rapid-uptake-of-mobile-money-transfer-in-kenya-really-mean-for-financial-inclusion/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+cgaptechnology+%28CGAP+Technology+Blog%29&utm_content=Google+Feedfetcher
    Centre for Financial Inclusion blogpost: http://centerforfinancialinclusionblog.wordpress.com/2012/04/20/mobile-money-transfer-what-does-it-mean-for-financial-inclusion/#more-6222

  2. Hi Duncan!

    “Don’t pack away those fertilizers just yet. A comprehensive review of research on organic v chemical agriculture concludes that organic yields are significantly lower, although it varies a lot by crops (strawberries and soybeans do better).

    Solution to world hunger?”

    Is this a Freudian Slip or a fact so significant that should prompt Oxfam to scrap your Climate Smart Agriculture?

    Whatever, I wrote a post entitled “Has Oxfam finally seen the Light?”

    “http://devconsultancygroup.blogspot.in/2012/05/has-oxfam-finally-seen-light-yields-of.html

  3. Re the film on sharing: people are represented passively, not as benefiting from from the right to work. They hear about charity, portrayals of famines as people that need to be fed (in order not to put into question whether production is a means or and end = how long are they gonna last, and what is the value of lasting when we actually know how damaging are the agro-accultural market. in a world where unemployment is one of the major cause for no decent job and ethical implementation to take place. Where everyone is frightened to death to lose one’s living of the privileged (being employed)? Where work is considered outside the frame of existence of living. To say that “people could be fed”, instead how could we work the land without weakening.

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