Post-Apocalyptic bookshops and other Links I Liked

Ah yes, balance HT @johnb78 World Population Growth. Brilliant, comprehensive, chart-tastic and interactive summary of everything you could want to know (and then some) about national/global demographics In Africa, ‘ the microcredit industry is not a driver of development and poverty reduction, but quite the opposite: it is an “anti-developmental”. Milford Bateman doing what he […]

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Audio summary of FP2P posts, week beginning 9th September

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How does Coalitions for Change in the Philippines Compare with other Adaptive Management Programmes?

Following on yesterday’s podcast + transcript about the work of the Coalitions for Change (CfC) programme in the Philippines, I thought I’d compare it to the 3 Adaptive Management programmes I’ve also been studying in Tanzania, Nigeria and Myanmar. Let’s take context first, and then think about the nuts and bolts of the different programmes. […]

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Podcast: Thinking and Working Politically in a Pioneering Programme in the Philippines

Earlier this year I spent a fascinating week in the Philippines with the Coalitions for Change programme, one of the pioneers of ‘Thinking and Working Politically’ in the aid sector. CfC is run by The Asia Foundation and funded by the Australian Government. It ‘focuses on key policy reforms to improve lives of Filipinos and […]

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The Chemistry of Tear Gas and other Links I Liked

The front row of the third annual Budapest Demographic Summit launch. The conference is focused on raising the fertility rates in central and eastern Europe. HT Valerie Hopkins Mandela on Mugabe: ‘the trouble with Mugabe is that he was the star – and then the sun came up.’ Top obit from the excellent David Smith […]

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Audio Summary (10m) of FP2P posts, w/b 2nd September

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When democracies die, they die quietly… but what’s the role of Civil Society?

Save the Children’s José Manuel Roche has a book he wants you to read. So, it turns out that nowadays democracy seldom dies through violent coup d’état. More commonly (and insidiously), democracy slides gradually into authoritarianism.  By the same token, democracy survives when democratic leaders fight for it.  This is part of the main thesis […]

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We must stop climate change before it makes Hajj impossible

Here’s Shahin Ashraf of Islamic Relief on one reason why the climate emergency should matter to Muslims. The piece brilliantly illustrates Alex Evans’ argument that climate activists need to tap into the deep narratives provided by the world’s major religions if they are to get the drastic changes we need. Like most Muslims who’ve been […]

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Why our chances of addressing the Climate Crisis have never been better

Oxfam’s Tim Gore responds to my recent downbeat posts on the politics of the climate emergency. Duncan’s latest piece is a depressing read. He describes escalating climate-related disasters amidst a lack of political leadership and rising populism. The prospects of today’s agents of change – Extinction Rebellion and the school strikers – are “bleak”. His […]

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Ha-Joon Chang as a sweary cat and other Links I Liked

Why everyone should love Viv Richards (ht Brian Lara) Excellent and strikingly optimistic Briefing: Sudan comes in from the cold as it transitions to civilian rule. Hope it’s warranted Applications open Wednesday 28 August for LSE Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity, a funded programme that brings the world’s change-makers to London to share […]

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Audio summary (15m) of FP2P posts, week beginning 26th August

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The How Change Happens of Climate Change

Following on yesterday’s conversation with Matthew Lockwood, I was recently interviewed by a new ‘slow news’ site called Tortoise, Tortoise Tortoise (nice name). They were doing a background piece on the climate change movement, and wanted to discuss the politics. Apart from regurgitating Matthew’s ideas, (with credit natch), I looked at the 2018/19 upsurge as […]

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