Author: Duncan Green

This is a conversational blog written and maintained by Duncan Green, strategic adviser for Oxfam GB and author of ‘From Poverty to Power’. This personal reflection is not intended as a comprehensive statement of Oxfam's agreed policies.

What would a feminist approach to localisation of humanitarian action look like?

Guest post from Francesca Rhodes, Oxfam’s Gender Policy Adviser on campaigns, policy and influencing The aid sector’s sexual exploitation and abuse crisis  put into stark spotlight the unequal power dynamics between humanitarian actors and communities they work in, and the injustices this can cause. Discussions on what a humanitarian system, and Oxfam itself, would look…

By Duncan Green August 14, 2018 0

Links I Liked

A summary of Elinor Ostrom’s (only woman to win the Nobel for economics) ‘rules for radicals’ from Derek Wall’s new book. Wish she’d done a systems version of no 13 though – complex is not the same as complicated, simple or chaotic Academic spats are always fun. Here it’s profs v PhD students at the…

By Duncan Green August 13, 2018 0

What kind of Tax Campaigning works best in developing countries – top down or bottom up?

Tax Justice has become a big deal among a range of NGOs, including Oxfam. There’s a lot of global campaigning on things like tax havens and tax evasion by transnational corporations, but what kinds of campaign make sense at a national level in countries like Vietnam and Nigeria? Two new pieces dropped into my inbox…

By Duncan Green August 10, 2018 0

5 Things I learned about how to Communicate Research on Sustainability

Is it possible to achieve a sustainable future where the social needs of all are met without exhausting the planet’s resources? Julia Steinberger shares lessons learnt from communicating her research findings. Earlier this year, my colleagues and I published an article entitled “A Good Life For All Within Planetary Boundaries” in Nature Sustainability. In this article, we…

By Duncan Green August 9, 2018 1

Don’t worry. Be factful: Review of Factfulness, by Hans and Ola Rosling, and Anna Rosling Rönnlund

Matthew Spencer reviews Hans Rosling’s posthumous manifesto When Hans Rosling, the TED talk phenomenon and professor of international health, was a young doctor in Mozambique in the 1980’s he was berated by a visiting friend and medic for not providing better care for a seriously ill child that been brought into his health clinic. Hans…

By Duncan Green August 8, 2018 2

The evidence suggests that support for UK development NGOs is actually growing

According to Dan Brockington and Nicola Banks, the evidence suggests that the demise of UK aid is greatly exaggerated. They want to know if they’ve missed something… International development NGOs are facing interesting times in the UK. We live in a rising tide of nationalism, parochialism and suspicion of, not care for, distant strangers. Austerity measures make…

By Duncan Green August 7, 2018 3

Links I Liked

Am I mansplaining? Handy guide from Kim Goodwin Tips from DFID’s Chief Economist on how researchers can influence policy (podcast) New Oxfam study of Pakistan’s World Bank Public Private Partnership (PPP) programme in education comes to pretty damning conclusions on exclusion, cherry picking best students, poor quality teaching and low teacher wages. Analysis of four leading…

By Duncan Green August 6, 2018 2

Of the World’s top 100 economic revenue collectors, 29 are states, 71 are corporates

Oh good, researchers at the University of Amsterdam have updated the list of the world’s big hitters using 2016 figures. In the past, previous such lists offended purists because they compared apples (national GDP) with oranges (corporate revenue). This time the authors in their background paper say have tried to include only government revenue: ‘we…

By Duncan Green August 3, 2018 3

What restrains extreme violence – Culture or the Law?

Ed Cairns on how advocates of international humanitarian law have started getting excited about culture and norms Do we need to get used to war? That’s the frightening question from the 2018 Armed Conflict Survey, from the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), launched with the blunt message that ‘peace processes are stalling… the number…

By Duncan Green August 2, 2018 3