Topic: Health and Education

Local Diaries: Untold Stories of Women in India’s lockdown

Priyanka Kotamraju (@peekayty ) introduces the Local Diaries: Untold Stories of Women podcast. She is an editor in the Chitrakoot Collective and an Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity. Sadrunissa is a young woman from Varanasi in northern India whose dreams abruptly faded in the wake of COVID-19. In January, she joined a tailoring course. It was […]

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Localization in Advocacy? Don’t hold your breath (and look outside the aid system)

Johns Hopkins University and the Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health are doing some thinking on the future of advocacy, especially on health-related issues, but of wider relevance. The first of three papers is now out, on Local Ownership, Sustainability, and Grant-making. Two other briefs in the series are in the pipeline, on the […]

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Covid-19 in Africa: How Youth are Stepping Up

This is a shortened and slightly updated version of a post by Alcinda Honwana and Nyeleti Honwana, which first appeared on the SSRC’s Kujenga Amani blog The African continent has, thus far, fared comparatively well in the pandemic, with just under 400,000 confirmed infections and about 10,000 fatalities at the end of June 2020. Even so, the […]

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Optimistic or pessimistic about Covid-19? No need to choose

Jordi Vaquer is the Director for Global Foresight and Analysis at the Open Society Foundations The radical uncertainty resulting from the crises triggered by the Covid-19 pandemic makes prediction harder than ever and, yet, there has rarely been a time where everyone – thinkers and parents, artists and bankers, activists and teachers – had to […]

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How Important is the Weight of History in Shaping Covid Responses?

There’s an interesting pattern that emerges from the coverage of how different countries have performed in their Covid-19 response: it is greatly influenced by their experience of previous disease outbreaks:  Kerala had Nipah, which made all the difference according to this piece in The Guardian China had SARS and South Korea had MERS West Africa, Uganda and DRC […]

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What kind of research should inform Covid responses?

This post is co-authored with Irene Guijt If we agree that evidence-informed policy and practice are good things, we need to think about what kind of research gets commissioned. Some kinds of research are definitely more useful than others.  We’ve been discussing the urgent needs in Covid research with Heather Marquette (after her great April […]

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Will Patents stop Covid drugs from saving lives?

Guest post by Ken Shadlen of the LSE The Covid-19 pandemic has sparked a global race of public- and private-led research to develop vaccines and treatments. Will patents hinder access to the products it generates? My summary? With regard to treatments (the dynamics around vaccines may differ), access problems will mainly affect middle-income countries. While […]

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Development Nutshell: audio round-up (11 mins) of FP2P posts, w/b 1 June

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Beyond the Western Gaze: How should we talk about Covid and Africa?

This brilliant post by George Kibala Bauer was first published on the Africa is a Country blog We all know the feeling—we read an article by a Western pundit, or listen to a broad-brushing intervention on everything that is wrong with Africa, and we feel the need to put the Westerner and their underlying worldview […]

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Can we understand COVID-19 fast enough – and well enough – to make a difference?

Guest post by Lavinia Tyrrel, Linda Kelly, Chris Roche and Elisabeth Jackson In Love in the Time of Cholera Gabriel Garcia Marquez plays on the themes of love and passion, comparing them to a plague like cholera. Referring to the two lovers in the story he notes “…if they had learned anything together, it was […]

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Links I Liked (mainly Covid, natch)

ICYMI, put this wonderful post by Robert Chambers up yesterday afternoon. Humour, Postcolonial Irony and Covid-19 in Africa, by David Mwambari and Laura S Martin Serious about shifting norms as a pathway to change? Why Sesame Street Was a Revolutionary Force for Children’s Television ht Ranil Dissayanake What if some African governments are doing a […]

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Reflections on an involuntary immersion, by Robert Chambers

Just read this extraordinary piece by one of my heroes, Robert Chambers, and wanted to share it. Fans and admirers all over the world will be wishing you a speedy recovery, Robert. I have just returned home after a health-related immersion of over 10 weeks as a patient and participant-observer in an NHS hospital and […]

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