Topic: Health and Education

What is Gordon Brown thinking on the G20 summit?

I joined a roomful of suits today for an hour with the PM. The venue was Lancaster House, the pink marble and gilt architectural cheesecake that will be the venue for the G20 summit on 2 April. Perhaps there’s guilt as well as gilt – Lancaster House previously hosted talks that led to the independence […]

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Is The Economist going socialist?

The back half of The Economist (business, finance and economics) is having an excellent crisis. If you’re willing to filter out the gratuitous (and increasingly defensive) neoclassical riffs, there is some really excellent analysis in there and even some (perhaps inadvertent) progressive thinking. This week’s edition includes a three page briefing on the Asian economies and […]

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Pregnancy and childbirth still killing 500,000 women a year, nearly all in Africa and South Asia

Gender injustice is toxic to development, nowhere more clearly than in the stark fact that having a child remains one of the biggest health risks for women worldwide. Fifteen hundred women die every day from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. That’s half a million women every year, and the number has hardly budged in […]

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Some killer facts (and some life savers) on Health in Malawi

And unfortunately, I mean killer, although there is progress to report too. This cup half full/half empty analysis comes from a new country study for Oxfam’s Essential Health Services Campaign.

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A definitive overview of education in the developing world

My predecessor at Oxfam, Kevin Watkins, went off into the labyrinth of the UN system where he has produced a series of monumental reports. At UNDP he led (i.e. wrote) a series of landmark Human Development Reports on International Cooperation, Water and Sanitation and Climate Change. From there it was off to UNESCO where his […]

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Cuba beats USA again, this time on child welfare

I’m no apologist for the Cuban government, but it’s noteworthy that despite its much lower GDP per capita, Cuba keeps beating much richer countries in social and environmental league tables drawn up by some highly respectable NGOs. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Oxfam America contrasted the carnage in New Orleans with Cuba’s extraordinarily effective […]

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