Topic: NGOs

Robin Hood, Robin Hood, dum dum dum de dum: financial transaction tax update from Max Lawson

The Robin Hood Tax campaign to fund development and climate change adaptation via a small financial transactions tax (FTT) is potentially one of the campaigning success stories of recent years – an object lesson in how to seize the moment (global financial crisis and fiscal horror story in the rich countries) to promote a good […]

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How to work in fragile states – some thoughts from Oxfam's big cheeses

When Oxfam’s big cheeses come together, they have a tendency to issues ‘communiqués’ about their conclusions to be sent out to what they fondly imagine are battalions of eager staff desperately awaiting their words of wisdom (bosses can be funny that way). Reality is usually rather different but one recent communiqué – on working in […]

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What’s New in Development?

An edited version of this piece went up on the Guardian Development website yesterday, summarizing the latest round of horizon-scanning powerpoints: How people understand and think about development is in a state of constant churn and upheaval. Some ideas are genuinely new, prompted by new technologies and ground-breaking political movements. Other ideas are old, previously […]

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Really CGD? Really? The perils of attack blogs.

Update: A graceful apology from the CGD here.: ‘I deeply apologize to Oxfam and its partners and to our readers for the tone of my post. I should have dialed way back on the snark. Mea culpa.’ Kudos to Amanda Glassman for that. She doesn’t give on inch on the issues, so there will doubtless […]

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Inequality: what difference does it make to NGOs' work?

What difference does an inequality ‘lens’ make to the way we think about development and advocacy at national level? I’ve just been reading ‘Time for Equality: Closing Gaps, Opening Trails’, an excellent paper by the UN’s Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean – one of the most innovative and interesting bits of the […]

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So where have we got to on Value for Money, Results etc?

Great posts, great comments. My head is now spinning as I try and disentangle some of the different threads that have emerged over the last two days. First: horses for courses. Some aid work is akin to Ros’ bathroom problem – linear, measurable, and suitable for a logframe + results approach. Other areas are emergent […]

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If not results, then what? The risks of not having a results agenda

The ODI’s Claire Melamed replies to yesterday’s guest post from Ros Eyben: “Ros Eyben suggests that instead of a results agenda, we should rely on good relationships to deliver good aid.  And indeed, if all relationships were good, and all the people involved in making decisions about aid were thoroughly well-informed, open to new ideas, […]

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‘Stuff happens’: the risks of a results agenda. Guest post from Rosalind Eyben

A few months ago, I blogged about the risks associated with the aid industry’s current overriding obsession with audit/value for money/results (pick your term). Since then, that debate has been swirling around both on this blog and (more importantly), in aid and development circles in many countries. So to help it along a bit I’ve […]

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The World Bank gender team responds; lessons from successful women's rights coalitions; male attitudes to violence against women: some reading for International Women's Day

Some International Women’s Day reading at the wonky end of the spectrum. Firstly, an excellent response from its co-directors (Ana Ravenga and Sudhir Shetty) to my earlier post on this year’s World Development Report on Gender Equality, whose website goes live today. Secondly check out a couple of papers on the Developmental Leadership Program website. The DLP describes […]

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How can better models of change sharpen up our work on development?

Regular visitors to this blog will know that I’ve been doing quite a lot of floundering about thinking on different models of change (e.g. what triggered the revolution in Egypt? What does complexity theory add to/subtract from our thinking about development?) Partly it’s because in my ideal world, every time an NGO or research institution […]

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How to use research for influence on climate change and Arab meltdown; why aid donors are losing the plot; green growth v degrowth; Darth Vader on youtube: links I liked

The Washington-based Center for Global Development is great at spotting opportunities for influence, not least by dusting off and recycling previous work in response to events – a key, and often under-used, way of getting research into policy (academics are often too caught up with their next project, and NGOs with their next campaign, to […]

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Holiday destinations for development wonks – any advances on Zanzibar?

For the last two weeks, despite any appearance of activity on this blog, I have been on a blissful holiday in Zanzibar. There, I’ve said it – NGO wonks take holidays, sometimes quite nice ones. Feels as if I’m breaking some kind of taboo, like admitting that we get paid. And climate change just adds […]

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