Development Studies is fun, but is there a job at the end of it?

Duncan Green - February 8, 2018

Studying development is fascinating, but will there be jobs for students once they graduate? I chaired a careers panel for LSE students recently, where a variety of alums, now rising up the greasy poles of the aid industry, came back to share their thoughts. One recurring theme of the evening was the kind of skills and knowledge that will be needed if the aid industry …

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What does ‘Dignity’ add to our understanding of development?

Duncan Green - February 7, 2018

Guest post from Tom Wein, of the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics, based in Nairobi. Is your program respectful? How, exactly, do you know that? Did you ask people? Development aims to give people better lives. In doing so, we mainly aim to increase wealth and health – in part because we can measure those outcomes with ease. But there’s more to a good life …

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My (current) default suggestions when asked about almost anything to do with ‘strategy’

Duncan Green - January 31, 2018

I realised recently that I have a fairly standard playlist of topics I bang on about to people during the frequent ‘blue sky’ (well, the initials are BS, anyway) sessions after someone phones up and says something like ‘can I pick your brains as part of our strategy refresh?’ So I thought, if I am going to give the same answers whatever the questions, I …

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When is eradicating a major disease a disaster for healthcare?

Duncan Green - January 30, 2018

Guest post from Laura Kerr, Senior Policy Advocacy Officer (Child Health), RESULTS UK The world is on the brink of a historic breakthrough – the eradication of polio. Cause for celebration, right? Well yes, in terms of getting rid of a killer disease, but because of the way the aid business has distorted health systems around the developing world, the end of polio could tip …

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The Perils of Male Bias: Alice Evans replies to yesterday’s ‘Sausagefest’

Duncan Green - January 11, 2018

Yesterday’s post on Stefan Dercon‘s lecture got a lot of hits, but also some slaps for its perceived male bias. In response, Alice Evans (@_alice_evans, who memorably described Stefan’s list of top development thinkers as a ‘sausagefest’) put together this corrective account of women’s scholarship on development. Across the world, we tend to venerate men as knowledgeable authorities. These gender stereotypes are self-perpetuating: by paying more …

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10 top thinkers on Development, summarized in 700 words by Stefan Dercon

Duncan Green - January 10, 2018

One of the treats of my role at LSE is luring in some great development thinkers to lecture on Friday afternoons, and then sitting in to enjoy the show. Stefan Dercon came in just before the Christmas break and was typically brilliant, witty and waspish. Particularly enjoyable from an outgoing DFID chief economist (as well as Prof at the Blavatnik School of Government and Director …

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The Unvarnished Project Cycle

Duncan Green - January 8, 2018

Continuing the most-read FP2P posts from 2017, in reverse order. Here’s the runner up. Click on the original to see the comments. This is genius from Lisa McNally – feel free to suggest further improvements And I guess this is the exec sum, although it’s actually a very optimistic version, in that ‘what happened’ ends up roughly in the same place as the planned version, in …

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Want to ensure your research influences policy? Top advice from a Foreign Office insider.

Duncan Green - January 4, 2018

The most read posts from 2017, in reverse order. Here’s number 4. Check out the original if you want to read the comments. The conference on ‘Protracted Conflict, Aid and Development’ that I wrote about on Friday was funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund, a massive (£1.5bn) UK research programme that is funding, among other things, the LSE’s new Centre for Public Authority and International Development, where I’ll be …

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Aidspeak: some of your best/worst responses to my call for examples

Duncan Green - January 3, 2018

I’m on holiday for the first week of 2018, trying to see the Northern Lights in Norway. In the meantime, here are the most-read posts from 2017, in reverse order starting with number 5. Here’s the original if you want to read the comments Well you took a few hours to get started in response to Tuesday’s post, but then the floodgates opened and an avalanche …

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What did I learn in Myanmar about what Adaptive Programming actually looks like?

Duncan Green - December 15, 2017

I’m still processing a fascinating week in Myanmar. No I wasn’t in Rakhine, in case you’re wondering (separate post on that may follow). Instead, along with aid programming guru Angela Christie, I was exploring what ‘adaptive management’ looks like on the ground, and how it compares to all the fine-sounding stuff repeated endlessly in aid seminars around the world. The lab rat for this was …

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