Topic: General

Can we Get Davos talking about the Care Economy and Feminist Economics?

Davos is here again, which is always a fun time to be working for Oxfam. Every January, the world’s political and economic leaders jet in to Switzerland, and we try to persuade them, and their press entourage, to focus on the way that growing inequality is holding back global poverty reduction. This kicked off in […]

Read More »

Decolonization, Decoloniality and the Future of African Studies

As discussions of the decolonization of academia gain momentum, Duncan Omanga interviews Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni, research professor and director for scholarship in the Department of Leadership and Transformation in the Principal and Vice-Chancellor’s Office at the University of South Africa. These are extracts from a longer (3,000 word) piece published on the SSRC blog. If […]

Read More »

Links I Liked

Working from Home, ht The New Yorker Ten humanitarian crises and trends to watch in 2020 ‘The retreat of charisma from humanitarian organizations is a challenge for us all’. Hugo Slim brilliant on the bureaucratization of humanitarian aid How Academia Resembles a Drug Gang. LSE Impact blog’s most read post of the decade. Please welcome […]

Read More »

Can DFID survive? 2019 in review + other FP2P posts. Audio round up for w/b 6th Jan

Read More »

Can sustainable architecture help the homeless?

Weeks after the climate change conference in Madrid (COP25) and starting the new year with a mix of fear and anticipation, it is a fitting time to think of those who are most vulnerable to the impacts of the climate crisis. Particularly, those without a place to live: the homeless. Below is the transcript of […]

Read More »

How can we incorporate local knowledge into climate planning and policy?

This reflection is offered by Ibrahim Jarso, Rangelands Specialist at MercyCorps, Hausner Wendo, Climate Information & Resilience Planning Officer at the Adaptation Consortium and Sam Greene, Researcher on Climate Change at the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Isiolo County in northern Kenya’s arid and semi-arid region is typical of many dryland landscapes. Pastoralists […]

Read More »

How to stop the Foreign Office gobbling up DFID?

File under ‘sounds boring, but is really important’: sources inside the UK Department for International Development (DFID) recently told the Guardian that they fully expect the department to be merged with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) after Brexit (end of this month), as part of a wider effort to slim down government and in […]

Read More »

The Year in Africa

If you don’t receive ‘This Week in Africa’, check it out – it’s an amazing and wide-ranging round up of links put together by Jeff (American) and Phil (Zimbabwean) and hosted by the University of San Francisco. And their annual version is even better. Their 2019 summary is way too long for a blog, so […]

Read More »

Top FP2P posts for 2019 and the decade + reader stats

I always start the year with stats and most-read posts from the previous 12 months, but guess we better add a ‘best of the decade’ section this time. Yep, FP2P has been going since the noughties – the first post went up in July 2008. WordPress tells me that 2,757 posts have been published to […]

Read More »

Responses to ‘Are INGOs ready to give up power?’

On Wednesday, we republished this timely thought piece by Deborah Doane, which interrogates the power held by large NGOs and calls for a shift of power. The article clearly hit a nerve. Questions around #ShiftingThePower bring up enormous systemic (and existential) considerations that pose direct challenges not only to the structures we operate in, but […]

Read More »

Are INGOs ready to give up power?

Deborah Doane opens up a provocative and necessary discussion around the power held by INGOs, and how we can shift it. Deborah Doane is a Partner at Rights CoLab, and a writer and consultant working with civil society and philanthropy. She is steering a project on reimagining the INGO. This piece was originally published on […]

Read More »

Economics for People: check out this free online lecture series from Ha-Joon Chang

Please take the reader survey – FP2P is changing fast and we need your feedback and advice! ‘Ha-Joon Chang Thought’ is rapidly becoming A Thing. The Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) has just released ‘Economics for People’, a set of 12 lectures by Ha-Joon, who teaches at Cambridge and manages to have rock star status […]

Read More »