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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - January 15, 2018

Blimey, that was quite a week. Here are a few things I managed to read in the eye of the #sausagefest-gate twitterstorm: Men asking questions in seminars – the cartoon version Raj Chetty in 14 charts: Big findings on opportunity and mobility in US. Why other African states should not follow the “Rwandan model”. Nick Cheeseman piece ‘born of out my frustration with people telling …

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If academics are serious about research impact, they need to learn from advocates

Duncan Green - January 9, 2018

All hail FP2P-reading nerds! Completing the round up of top posts from last year, the most read from 2017 is on research impact. Here’s the original for a lot of comments, many of them heaping scorn on me for being so out of touch – always a treat.  As someone who works for both Oxfam and the LSE, I often get roped in to discuss how …

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The Unvarnished Project Cycle

Duncan Green - January 8, 2018

Continuing the most-read FP2P posts from 2017, in reverse order. Here’s the runner up. Click on the original to see the comments. This is genius from Lisa McNally – feel free to suggest further improvements And I guess this is the exec sum, although it’s actually a very optimistic version, in that ‘what happened’ ends up roughly in the same place as the planned version, in …

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$15bn is spent every year on training, with disappointing results. Why the aid industry needs to rethink ‘capacity building’.

Duncan Green - January 5, 2018

The most read posts from 2017, in reverse order. Number 3 is a guest post from Lisa Denney of ODI. Check out the original if you want to read the comments. Every year a quarter of international aid – approximately US$15 billion globally – is spent on capacity development. That is, on sending technical assistants to work in ministries or civil society, running training programmes, conducting study tours or exchanges, or …

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Want to ensure your research influences policy? Top advice from a Foreign Office insider.

Duncan Green - January 4, 2018

The most read posts from 2017, in reverse order. Here’s number 4. Check out the original if you want to read the comments. The conference on ‘Protracted Conflict, Aid and Development’ that I wrote about on Friday was funded by the Global Challenges Research Fund, a massive (£1.5bn) UK research programme that is funding, among other things, the LSE’s new Centre for Public Authority and International Development, where I’ll be …

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Aidspeak: some of your best/worst responses to my call for examples

Duncan Green - January 3, 2018

I’m on holiday for the first week of 2018, trying to see the Northern Lights in Norway. In the meantime, here are the most-read posts from 2017, in reverse order starting with number 5. Here’s the original if you want to read the comments Well you took a few hours to get started in response to Tuesday’s post, but then the floodgates opened and an avalanche …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - January 2, 2018

Welcome back, those who’ve been away. The twittersphere never stops, so here’s some random links to help you catch up. 48 superimposed photos of the sun, taken during a year, one per week, in the same place and time, in the Cathedral of Burgos. The highest point is the summer solstice and the lowest is the winter solstice. But can someone please explain to me …

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See you in 2018 people, and please wish me luck in Tromso

Duncan Green - December 21, 2017

Got a bunch of things to get finished before Christmas, and judging from the falling number of blog readers (thanks, Google Analytics), so has everyone else. So for everyone’s sake, I’m calling a blog break til the New Year. After Christmas I’ll be heading off to the top of Norway to try and see the Northern Lights. If there are clear skies, it could like …

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Links I Liked

Duncan Green - December 18, 2017

Some pleasing funnies this week, via Robert Went and Amy Klatzkin ‘Cash transfers reduced tobacco and alcohol consumption’, according to a meta-analysis of 19 studies. Possible reasons: CTs encourage other spending on good stuff (health, education); people following the advice on how to spend that often accompanies CTs; and CTs usually go to women & increase their say in broader household spending. Does your social …

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How are INGOs Doing Development Differently? 5 of them have just taken a look.

Duncan Green - December 13, 2017

Hats off to World Vision for pulling together some analysis on where large international NGOs (INGOs) have got to on ‘Doing Development Differently’ (see the 2014 manifesto if you’re not up to speed on DDD). Up to now, NGOs have been rather quiet in a discussion dominated by government aid agencies, academics and thinktanks. World Vision asked Dave Algoso to look at examples from 5 …

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