Topic: General

You’re wrong Kate. Degrowth is a compelling word

Giorgos Kallis responds to yesterday’s post on degrowth by Kate Raworth, plus you get a chance to vote My friend Kate Raworth ‘cannot bring herself to use the word’ degrowth. Here are nine reasons why I use it. 1. Clear definition. ‘Degrowth’ is as clear as it gets. Definitely no less clear than ‘equality’; or ‘economic […]

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The Adaptation Gap (and how to deal with it)

Ben Ramalingam, newly appointed leader of the Digital and Technology cluster at IDS, and author of Aid on the Edge of Chaos, shares some thoughts on ‘adaptive management’. Over the next few weeks, Duncan has agreed to run a series of posts by participants in the recent USAID-IDS workshop on adaptive management, to share their ideas, […]

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Links I Liked

Spending the next two weeks in Australia (Melbourne and Canberra) and Vanuatu consulting on the book draft and scavenging some last minute new material. Speaking in Melbourne at launch of Politics of Results book on Tuesday. Details here. Otherwise it’s all non-public events at ANU, DFAT etc. Also means I’m glad to see this Economist […]

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Why is the World Bank Group dragging its feet over its disastrous PPP policy on funding healthcare?

Oxfam health policy lead Anna Marriott gets back from maternity leave to find that the World Bank Group is dragging its feet over a disastrous health contract in Lesotho Back in April 2014, World Bank Group President Jim Kim said in a televised interview (19 ½ minutes in) that his organisation would be ‘the’ go-to […]

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What can we learn from Mexico’s tax on fizzy drinks?

Alice Evans of Cambridge University looks for lessons from a small victory in the global struggle against obesity We in the development industry are often frustrated by lack of government transparency, disregard of the evidence, and lack of political will to address major social problems. Such obstacles are universal. Perhaps we might learn ‘how change happens’ (to use […]

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Links I Liked

Heavy on the video content this week – if you’re in the office, better get your earphones on Consent, sex and tea: quintessentially British and rather effective [h/t Richard Cunliffe] Last chance to vote in the Rusty Radiator awards for 2015’s worst aid charity video. Amazingly, they found one that’s even worse than Band Aid. […]

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Links I Liked

Powerful, harrowing photo essay of Syrian refugee children asleep. Suffragettes v suffragists. Nice movie, shame about the (lack of) theory of change – it was really the suffragists wot won it Oxfam America takes on Big Chicken in the US, using leader/laggard tactics to push for a better deal for 250,000 workers and getting some […]

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Is China’s rise relevant to today’s poorest states?

Am I allowed to say that a meeting held under Chatham House Rules took place at Chatham House? Let’s risk it. I recently attended a fascinating conference on UK-China relations, which discussed the two governments’ burgeoning cooperation on development issues. This seems to be turning into a triangular relationship, in which the UK and China […]

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Links I Liked

In 1800 there was no country with a life expectancy over 40. Please excuse the self promotion, but if you’re in Washington Weds, please come along to discuss How Change Happens at CGD. Put the draft book up on Friday, and the first review went up same day – not that’s what I call fast […]

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A nice example of how government-to-government peer pressure can lead to innovation

Guest post from John Hammock of the Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative In your thought-provoking blog ‘Hello SDGs, what’s your theory of change?’ you rightly identify peer pressure as a potentially very effective means of governments coming to internalise the SDGs in their domestic processes and influencing others to follow suit. Let me give […]

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Of Sasquatches and Flexible Programming: A genuine sighting

Lisa Denney, Research Associate at the Overseas Development Institute, goes in search of an elusive development beast. Much has been written recently on the need for more flexible and adaptive development programming. This area has spawned considerable research attention across sectors, multiple workshops and communities of practice – but such ways of working in practice […]

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Links I Liked

Top geek cartoonist XKCD supports World Polio Day, while managing to satirise innovation fetishists On the other hand, for all the tech sceptics out there, here’s the price of light over the last 700 years, from Max Roser Where to go for reliable gender stats, including that 2/3 of the world’s illiterate adults are women: […]

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