Topic: General

Links I Liked

Grammar pedants rally behind the Oxford comma, [h/t Alexander Macleod] ‘International analysts predict the seeds of a so-called “American Spring,” fomented by technology’. How press would cover Baltimore if it was in a foreign country. [h/t Ian Birrell] Smart Owen Barder essay on the future of aid Planetary Boundaries and Human Prosperity. Kate Raworth teams up […]

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How can grassroots aid programmes influence the wider system?

In the first of two posts on how aid agencies can use their grassroots work to exert wider influence, Erinch Sahan discusses his work with livelihoods programmes (jobs, incomes etc). Tomorrow, I’ll discuss the conditions for such ‘joined-up influencing’ to work. “Give someone a fish and you feed them for a day; teach someone to […]

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Could the UN’s new Progress of the World’s Women provide the foundations for feminist economic policy?

Yesterday I went to the London launch of UN Women’s new flagship report, Progress of the World’s Women 2015-16, in the slightly incongruous setting of the Institution of Civil Engineers – walls adorned with portraits of bewigged old patriarchs  from a (happily) bygone era (right). The report is excellent. These big multilateral publications are usually […]

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Links I Liked

Europe’s migrant shame – a cartoon because words can’t suffice [h/t Alex Evans and Shulem Stern] The ups & downs of Sweden’s ‘feminist foreign policy’ UKIP  and the public debate on UK aid My life has changed completely: Yemeni Oxfam programme officer describes his family’s flight from the capital, fear  and the daily grind. 10 […]

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Here are some of the books that changed my life. What are yours?

I had a wonderfully self-indulgent day yesterday, spent in springtime Barcelona to give a talk on ‘the books that changed my life’, invited by ISGlobal, a health thinktank. The occasion was St George’s Day, when in Catalunya, the tradition is for men to give women a rose, and women give men a book. I know. […]

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Scale, Failure, Replication and Gardening: Continuing the Discussion on the future of Big Aid.

I’ve been having a series of great conversations on the draft of my new paper on the future of INGOs (plenty of time if you want to comment – here it is INGO futures, Green v5 April 2015 (edited)). Some of these have been under Chatham House Rules, so no names/organizations, but here are some […]

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Links I Liked

China and the West: Not bad for a text written 113 years ago [h/t Branko Milanovic]. ‘The road to development is paved with bad inventions’. Excellent Ben Ramalingam blog on Innovation ‘How to get governments and aid organizations to adapt to the good and throw out the bad?’ Chris Blattman riffs on a Dani Rodrik […]

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Where have we got to on Theories of Change? Passing fad or paradigm shift?

Theories of change (ToCs) – will the idea stick around and shape future thinking on development, or slide back into the bubbling morass of aid jargon, forgotten and unlamented? Last week some leading ToCistas at ODI, LSE and The Asia Foundation and a bunch of other organisations spent a whole day taking stock, and the discussion […]

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What has cancer taught me about the links between medicine and development? Guest post by Chris Roche

My friend and How Change Happens co-conspirator Chris Roche (@croche123) has had a rough year, but has used it to reach some interesting insights into the links between medicine and development. In July last year I was diagnosed with a pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumour. This is a rare disease and thankfully usually not as lethal as […]

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Fit for the Future? Systems thinking and the role of International NGOs – draft paper for your comments

I’m committing potential hara-kiri by giving a DFID staff talk on the future of INGOs tomorrow lunchtime (Wednesday) – if you’re an FP2P reader in DFID, do please come along. Here’s the background and a call for comments on the draft paper I’m presenting: (INGO futures, Green v5 April 2015 (edited)). Just before Christmas, Oxfam boss […]

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Links I Liked

Disarming (if unintentional) honesty: Oil company advertising has changed a bit since 1962 (not sure about their practice though) The Jeevan Bindi, which doubles as an iodine patch and could save millions of lives  [h/t Nisha Agrawal] Global obesity: 2.1 billion people are overweight or obese. It causes 5% of all deaths and costs $2 […]

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How businesses can save the world (when their shareholders aren’t breathing down their neck)

Erinch Sahan, an Oxfam ag and supply chain wonk who is currently leading its Food & Climate Policy and Campaigns, argues that the best way to understand a company’s approach to doing good is by asking who owns it. When it comes to the private sector, the biggest mistake the aid world makes is to […]

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