Topic: General

Impressions of humanitarianism (based on last week’s trip to the Eastern Congo)

Blimey, that was hard work. Still recovering from a ‘getting to know the humanitarians’ visit to Eastern Congo last week, having my skeleton rearranged by bouncing around for hours on truly execrable roads, and my insides rearranged by some persistent DRC microbes (I’ll spare you the details). I’ve always worked on the long term development […]

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Links I liked

Random World Cup bit: With their profession’s legendary record on prediction, The Economist forecasts the winners Good Health; Bad Health: Great overview of the Universal Health Coverage debate/new research from the ODI’s Kevin Watkins 2.1 billion people (30% of the global population) are now obese or overweight. 2/3 of the obese live in developing countries […]

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Jamie Love’s Next Big Idea: Making the WTO into a force for good in Public Health

I’ve heard the name Jamie Love mentioned in reverential tones over the years, and a few weeks ago, I was asked by STOPAIDS to interview him in an ‘in conversation’ format in front of a small group of activists. It was fantastic fun (for me at least). Jamie is director of Knowledge Ecology International and […]

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Help yourself: How do poor women and men understand their right to food?

Naomi Hossain of IDS introduces the latest report (launched today) from a joint IDS/Oxfam research programme on food prices. Do people at risk of hunger think they have a right to food? What does a right to food mean, and how can it be claimed and enforced? We asked these questions of around 1500 people in […]

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Building women’s leadership in the most difficult places (Pakistan) – case study for your comments

Next in the series of draft case studies on active citizenship, some fascinating work on women’s empowerment in Pakistan. Any comments on this draft paper (RHV Pakistan consultation draft) greatly appreciated. Well known for its highly articulate and influential women, Pakistan is also notorious for the severe restrictions placed on women’s personal and political liberties. The […]

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When is redistribution popular? When people first see social conflict rising, apparently. Useful new research.

This recent ODI paper by Laura Rodriguez Takeuchi made my head hurt (heavy on methodology, light on narrative, for my taste) but I think it’s worth persevering with. Analysing perception data for over 15,000 individuals in 40 countries, it arrives at two main findings: 1. Perceptions of social conflict have a strong influence on people’s […]

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Why aren’t we using government purchasing to promote the right to food (among other things)? Great farewell paper from Olivier de Schutter

Oliver de Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food reaches the end of his term at the end of May, leaving some pretty big shoes to fill. He summarized his arguments in March with a final report to the Human Rights Council, but kept on going til the end, with a really thought-provoking […]

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Links I liked

The World before Social media. So how come my desk is still messier than this? [h/t Bonnie Koenig]  Kate Raworth worries that even economist good guys like Ha-Joon Chang ignore planetary boundaries Brilliant powerpoint fodder from the ONE Campaign. 12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty’s biggest challenges. Sadly, ‘interactive copulation of data’ in chart 5 isn’t nearly as […]

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The case for democracy – a new study on India, South Africa and Brazil (shame it’s not much good – missed opportunity)

The ODI is a 10 minute train ride from my home, so I’m easily tempted out of my lair for the occasional lunchtime meeting. Last week it was the launch of ‘Democracy Works: The Democratic Alternative from the South’, a paper on the three ‘rapidly developing democracies’ of Brazil, India and South Africa, co-authored by […]

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Who Wants to Farm? Hardly any young people, it seems. Should/Could that change?

Since I started globetrotting many decades years ago, I’ve always asked peasants and farm labourers a simple question – ‘would you like your kids to become farmers?’ Across continents, the answer has hardly ever been ‘yes’. That creates a bit of a problem for the ‘peasant romantic’ wing of the aid business, who are then […]

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Supporting labour rights in Indonesia’s sportswear factories (Nike, Adidas etc). Draft case study for your comments

I’d like to continue picking your brains on the drafts of a series of case studies I’ve been working on. Next up is some long term advocacy on labour rights in Indonesia. Here’s the full draft case study for your comment (PC case study Indonesia Labour Rights Project May 2014). From 1997-2013 Oxfam Australia’s Indonesian […]

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Links I liked

Well you seemed to approve of the return of links I liked, so I’m giving it a regular Monday morning slot. ‘We must do something. This is something. So let’s do it.’ How Yes Minister would have loved hashtags. [cartoon h/t Foreign Policy] The Weekly Piketty: Dani Rodrik reviews the new guru on the block with surprisingly […]

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