Topic: General

Links I Liked

The campaign for the 7 May UK election is heating up folks: The areas in red have only ever had white male MPs [h/t Federica Cocco] Global Justice Now’s #FreeTheSeeds campaign: Are outsiders imposing disastrous noble-savageism, or defending Africa’s food security? Can religious groups help to prevent violent conflict? Nice examples from Nigeria, DRC, Most desired jobs […]

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Links I Liked

Bit of a (qualified) feelgood to this week’s links. The IT revolution, Somalia style: goats and sheep carry owners’ mobile numbers for identification [h/t Calestous Juma, photo credit @Lattif] Germany announces record boost to its aid budget to €7.4bn ($7.9bn = 0.4% of GNI) Great idea: a new global fund launched to help developing countries […]

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Four roles for the Multilateral System – how well will it perform any of them?

Along with a bunch of Oxfam’s specialist policy wonks, I recently helped Francoise Vanni, our new Director of Policy and Campaigns, put together a presentation on the multilateral system. Writing a new powerpoint is also a pretty good way to generate a blog post – key messages, simply transmitted (assuming you obey the ‘less than […]

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Modern Slavery: How widespread? What to do about it?

The Economist has a powerful series of articles on modern slavery this week. Sorry this is too long, but they write so well, I struggled to make cuts. How to reduce bonded labour and human trafficking “The time that I went into the camp and I looked, I was shocked. Where all my expectations and […]

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The best synthesis so far of where we’ve got to on ‘Doing Development Differently’

Finally got round to reading the ‘Adapting Development’ the ODI’s latest 54 page synthesis of the theory and practice underpinning the ‘Doing Development Differently’ approach. It’s very good – a good lit review, laced with lots of case studies and good insights – and definitely worth a careful read. Weirdly the bit that jumped out […]

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Links I Liked

A secret service version of “Where’s Waldo” in the New York Times front page photo of Obama’s recent visit to Selma [h/t Chris Blattman and Guo Xu (@misologie)] Excellent update on evolving Piketty debates – what he got right/wrong on inequality, how he’s responded to the backlash [h/t Ricardo Fuentes] Queuing innovation in a Thai Post Office. […]

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Can greater transparency help people hold big corporations to account? Some new tools that may help

My former boss Phil Bloomer seems to be having fun in his new role running the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Here BHRRC researcher Eniko Horvath profiles 2 new interactive platforms on company virtues/vices and how they can help the struggle for corporate responsibility. In Mexico, the Federal Electricity Commission sued activist Bettina Cruz, […]

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Four years into the Syrian conflict, we must never lose sight of the civilians behind the ‘story’

As the conflict in Syria enters its fifth year, Oxfam’s Head of Humanitarian Policy and Campaigns, Maya Mailer, reflects on a recent trip to Lebanon and Jordan, where she spoke with Syrian refugees, and asks whether we have become immune to the suffering of Syrians. If you type ‘Syria’ into Google News, the headlines that […]

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Links I Liked

Patriotism explained… 12 leading reporters on aid and development – one for your RSS/twitter feed ‘Frequent email checks temporarily lower your intelligence more than being stoned.’ Brilliant tips on how to be (more) efficient 227 studies later, what actually works to improve learning in developing countries? Teacher training, accountability and ‘Pedagogical interventions that match teaching […]

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What would persuade the aid business to ‘think and work politically’?

Some wonks from the ‘thinking and working politically’ (TWP) network discussed its influencing strategy last week. There were some people with proper jobs there, who demanded Chatham House Rules, which happily means I don’t have to remember who said what (or credit anyone). The discussion was interesting because it covered ground relevant to almost anyone […]

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Links I Liked

Forget mixed panels, how often do you see this at a conference? (although a crèche might have made her life easier…..) [h/t Rahma M Mian] Wonder what Dominique Strauss-Kahn would make of the IMF’s new report on national restrictions on women’s rights ‘Number of wrecked airplanes near the runway of the main airport’. Crowd-sourced “Real World […]

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Why premature deindustrialization is really bad news for development

One of the many positives about development is that lots of good stuff is happening much earlier in a country’s trajectory – on average, falling infant mortality, access to healthcare and education, rights, democracy etc all take place at lower levels of GDP per capita than in the past. Unfortunately, guru economist Dani Rodrik has […]

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