Topic: General

Links I Liked

Charlie Hebdo dominated the week. Here’s the best reaction piece I’ve seen so far (h/t Chris Blattman), and my two favourite cartoonist responses. For UK aid wonks: Simon Maxwell summarizes the OECD DAC peer review of Britain’s aid, raising some tough questions for DFID. Bloomberg Billionaires is tracking the wealth of the megarich. The world’s […]

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Why gay rights is a development issue in Africa, and aid agencies should speak up

Hannah Stoddart, on secondment as Oxfam’s advocacy manager in Rwanda, calls for aid agencies to take a stand in defence of beleaguered gay rights in Africa (and I ask you to vote on her suggestion) First Gambia, then Chad. Recent months have seen two more countries join the rising tide of State-led homophobia sweeping across […]

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Where do the world’s poorest people actually live? Big new databank on multidimensional poverty launched today

Has it ever struck you as pretty bonkers that we usually discuss poverty at national level, equating giant countries like India, with tiny islands whose population would disappear without trace in a single Indian city? If so, you, along with happy poverty nerds everywhere, should check out today’s Multidimensional Poverty Index from Sabina Alkire and […]

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Working With The Grain: an important new book on rethinking approaches to governance

Even though it’s relatively short (223 pages), Working With the Grain (WWTG) took me two months to finish, but I’m glad I did. It adds to a growing and significant body of literature on ‘doing development differently’/’thinking and working politically’ – Matt Andrews, Adrian Leftwich, David Booth, Diana Cammack, Sue Unsworth etc. (Like Matt and […]

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How many people? What do they read? 2014’s most popular posts + visitor stats for the year

Had a much less traumatic Christmas than last year (at least until I stepped on the scales) but now it’s back to work, so let’s start with the blog stats and most popular posts of 2014 (I’ll skip the flops). First of all, a huge thanks to all of you who continue to read, comment […]

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Links I liked

Bumper crop of tweets last week, and here are some of the best. And with that I’m signing off for Christmas – see you in 2015. Highest % of children in poverty in the developed world: 1 Greece; 3 Spain; 4 Israel; 6 US; 16 UK; 41 Norway [h/t Conrad Hackett] Fascinating analysis of the […]

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$2 leaving developing countries for every $1 going in – big new report on the state of global financial flows

A very useful new report from Eurodad, published today, provides ‘the most comprehensive review of the quantity of different financing sources available to developing countries, and how they have changed over the past decade.’ This in the run up to the big UN summit on financing for development (FfD) in Addis Ababa in July 2015. […]

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The new World Development Report (on mind, society and behavior): lots to like, but a big fail on power, politics and religion

This probably doesn’t need saying, but the World Development Report is a big deal. The World Bank’s annual flagships have a track record of shaping debates on particular issues, and raising them up the endlessly churning development agenda. So it pays to pay attention. This year’s WDR, published this month, is on ‘Mind, Society and […]

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Links I liked

This week’s selection from last week’s @fp2p twitter traffic  Relative girls & boys school enrolment worldwide. Red = more boys; Blue = more girls; Yellow = about equal. It’s getting complicated, people [h/t Conrad Hackett] The Harvard business school professor v the Chinese takeaway. Bonkers. [h/t Aditya Chakrabortty] Let’s talk governance and institutions: The recent […]

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The Living Wage: a remarkable story of global progress – how big could it get?

A few years ago, I was struck by the fervour with which a student activist acquaintance of mine, Stefan Baskerville, talked about the Living Wage. Every holiday he would leave his life of student activism (and occasional study) in Oxford and head for the East End of London, where he worked for Citizens UK, a […]

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How can small countries make a difference with their aid programmes?

Had a fun couple of days in Malta last week – amazing place, dripping with history – massive battlements, the Knights of Malta (right), amazing blinged-up churches, and some spectacular Caravaggios (my favourite one below). I was there to deliver a Kapuscinski Lecture  on ‘Citizen Empowerment and Mobilization’ – I’ll link to it when it goes online. […]

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You can’t take a supertanker white-water rafting: what future for International NGOs?

This post also appears on the ‘Practice for Change’ blog I try to avoid those endless bouts of INGO navel gazing, but don’t always succeed. Which is lucky, because recently, I had a really interesting session on ‘the future of INGOs’ at La Trobe University’s Institute for Human Security and Social Change in Melbourne. I […]

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