Topic: General

Is doing something about inequality a choice between bash the rich v tackling poverty? Some thoughts for Blog Action Day

Today is Blog Action Day, and we’re all supposed to blog about inequality. Ricardo Fuentes (Oxfam Head of Research) & his team are even marking the day by kicking off a new inequality-themed blog, Mind the Gap – check it out. I’ve already done my more general call to arms for BAD, so here’s something more in […]

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Is the era of flagship publications (HDR, WDR) coming to an end?

Had an interesting chat with some UNDP types last week in the Brixton cafe that is fast becoming my second office. In the same week as UNDP was named top donor on transparency (ahead of the UK and US), they were evaluating the UNDP’s flagship publication, the Human Development Report (HDR). Over the long term, […]

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Links I liked

Monday morning displacement activity, c/o highlights from last week’s @fp2p twitter feed Interesting comparison between interracial and same sex marriage in the US. The law moved ahead of public opinion (by decades) on interracial marriage, whereas it lags on same sex (but is catching up fast). Smart satire from the Karl reMarks blog: Global South […]

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9 Ways to get northern constituencies involved in changing the world: useful typology

Like everyone else, if Buzzfeed is any guide, I love a good list. I’m also increasingly obsessed with theories of change. So imagine my joy when I read Exfamer May Miller-Dawkins’ paper ‘9 Ways to Change the World’, which offers not one, but two lists. The paper is an attempt to come up with a typology […]

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DFID is changing its approach to better address the underlying causes of poverty and conflict – can it work? Guest Post from two DFID reformers

Aid donors are often maligned for bureaucratic procedures, a focus on short-term results at the expense of longer-term, riskier institutional change, and a technical, managerial approach to aid with insufficient focus on context, power and politics. Are these institutional barriers insurmountable? Can aid agencies create an enabling environment to think and work politically? Tom Wingfield (left) […]

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New research: A wage revolution could end extreme poverty in Asia, with massive knock-on effects in Africa

Spoke last week as a ‘discussant’ (my favourite speaking role, no prep required) at the launch of an extraordinary new ODI paper, with the deeply forgettable title ‘rural wages in Asia’ (we’ll come back to the title later). In one of those papers that restores your faith in economists, Steve Wiggins and Sharada Keats crunch […]

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Links I liked

Hold those Monday morning emails while you squander a few minutes on the highlights from last week’s tweeted clickbait (@fp2p) Wondering what to think about bombing ISIS/ISIL/IS (and could someone please explain why it has so many acronyms?) This excellent piece from Alex Evans makes a strong case against. The horror of air travel, beautifully […]

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This Sunday, Brazilians decide between two progressive women presidents. How do they compare?

Oxfam’s  country director, Simon Ticehurst (right), fills in the background ahead of this weekend’s election Some colleagues asked me this week, what is going to happen in the elections and who should I vote for? First up, prediction is not my forte. Last year in June I sent an optimistic briefing on Brazil to Oxfam´s […]

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Why I love the UN, aka the battle between policy space and trade/investment agreements

Being a fan of the UN is always a bit of a mixed blessing. Various bits (UNDP, UNICEF, UN Women and many more) churn out some really useful research. For many years, they provided the sole islands of sanity resisting the market fundamentalism of the Washington Consensus. But all too often their publications sink without […]

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Links I liked

My favourite image from the global climate protests around last week’s UN meeting: Australian Campaigners Salute the Government’s Climate Change Strategy [h/t Jim Harris] According to Pope Francis, ‘the corrupt should be tied to a rock and thrown into the sea’. Any chance that could become a new Oxfam policy recommendation? People had a lot […]

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After New York, how should climate change campaigners approach Paris? (aka Naomi Klein vs the New Climate Economy)

Oxfam head of policy for food and climate change Tim Gore reflects on what happens next after the euphoria of New York (and asks you to vote, right) First, the good news. After the Copenhagen hangover, the international climate change movement is back. Over recent days in New York, we’ve seen the emergence of a […]

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Measuring academic impact: discussion with my new colleagues at the LSE (joining in January, but not leaving Oxfam)

From the New Year, the London School of Economics International Development Department has roped me in to doing a few hours a week as a ‘Professor in Practice’ (PiP), in an effort to establish better links between its massive cohort of 300 Masters students (no undergrads) and ‘practitioners’ in thinktanks, NGOs etc. So with some […]

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