Topic: General

Links I Liked

A Monday morning time waste kit – highlights from last week’s @fp2p twitter feed: According to SIPRI, Africa’s arms spending grew 8.3% in last year – the fastest regional arms race in the world  Top polemic from Owen Barder. If the world was one country, global institutions would make it a failed state. Ben Ramalingam loves the […]

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If you read one paper on the post-2015 process, make it this one

The SDGs/post 2015 debate just got interesting. Regular readers of this blog will know that up to now I have been a convinced sceptic on the post-2015 circus (see this 2012 paper on why). But now the endless attempt to hang more/fewer development baubles on the SDG Christmas Tree is coming to an end, and we […]

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People Power: what do we know about empowered citizens and development?

This is a short piece written for UNDP, which is organizing my Kapuscinski lecture in Malta on Wednesday (4pm GMT, webcast live) Power is intangible, but crucial; a subtle and pervasive force field connecting individuals, communities and nations in a constant process of negotiation, contestation and change. Development is, at its heart, about the redistribution […]

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Links I Liked

Tried to stay abreast of the twitter stream while in Australia last week (back in UK now). Here’s some of the best links Squid ink infused black burger, tomato ice cream and other weird flavour combos from around the world, [h/t Chris Blatmann] The repeated “success, scale, fail” experience of aid magic bullets (playpumps etc) […]

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How to win the argument on the private sector; seeing like a liberal, and a lifecycle approach to supporting aid agencies

Had a great day at Oxfam Australia last week, immersed in a series of conversations that were dotted with ‘synaptic moments’, when different bits of thinking come together in your head and a lightbulb goes on. Three examples: Whose private sector is it anyway? The drumbeat of private sector rhetoric is deafening in Australia’s aid […]

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Who/what explains the world’s biggest developmental under-achievement? A visit to Papua New Guinea

So did you miss me? (I know, holes, heads etc) After a week on the road and away from the blog, it’s time to try and make sense of last week’s trip to Papua New Guinea (my first visit). I was there at the invitation of  the Development Leadership Program, which is funding my How Change […]

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Links I liked

OK, as you read this, I am wandering around Papua New Guinea, so there may be some interruptions to the blog over the next week or two. Sorry  about that. In the meantime, here’s some time suck material from last week’s @fp2p tweets. If you’re queasy early in the morning, look away now. This Double […]

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Politics, economists and the dangers of pragmatism: reflections on DFID’s governance and conflict conference

DFID really is an extraordinary institution. I spent Monday and Tuesday at the annual get together one of its tribes professional cadres – about 200 advisers on governance and conflict. They were bombarded with powerpoints from outside speakers (including me), but still found time for plenty of ‘social loafing’, aka networking with their mates. Some impressions: […]

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What are the big trends on conflict and fragility? Some great presentations at DFID

I spent a seriously interesting couple of days this week in a rainswept Brighton, attending DFID’s annual get together of its 200 (approx) governance and conflict advisers. Definitely worth a couple of posts – I’ll give some general impressions tomorrow, but want to start with a fascinating panel on conflict and fragility. First up was […]

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What next for human rights organizations like Amnesty?

Autumn/fall must be the blue skying season. I ended last week having my remaining brain cells picked in exchange for yet another free meal by Amnesty International’s Savio Carvalho (campaigns and advocacy) and Clare Doube (evaluation and strategy). Going to have to watch my waistline. They are thinking through Amnesty’s global strategy for 2016-2019, and […]

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Links I Liked

Another selection from last week’s @fp2p twitter-fodder  OK, let’s start with Ebola Helpful map (because the world seems confused on this point) Rick Rowden says the reason why health systems in West Africa are so ill-equipped to deal with Ebola. Is partly the fault of previous IMF programmes ‘Explain it like I’m 5’. UNICEF takes a […]

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How can Faith Groups get better at campaigning on climate change?

On Monday, I had not two fascinating big picture conversations under Chatham House Rules – these are a gift to bloggers as you don’t have to remember who said what,  and can take all the credit for anything clever. I’ve already blogged the discussion on theories of change and the Middle East. The second was […]

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