Topic: General

Links I liked

My favourite image from the global climate protests around last week’s UN meeting: Australian Campaigners Salute the Government’s Climate Change Strategy [h/t Jim Harris] According to Pope Francis, ‘the corrupt should be tied to a rock and thrown into the sea’. Any chance that could become a new Oxfam policy recommendation? People had a lot […]

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After New York, how should climate change campaigners approach Paris? (aka Naomi Klein vs the New Climate Economy)

Oxfam head of policy for food and climate change Tim Gore reflects on what happens next after the euphoria of New York (and asks you to vote, right) First, the good news. After the Copenhagen hangover, the international climate change movement is back. Over recent days in New York, we’ve seen the emergence of a […]

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Measuring academic impact: discussion with my new colleagues at the LSE (joining in January, but not leaving Oxfam)

From the New Year, the London School of Economics International Development Department has roped me in to doing a few hours a week as a ‘Professor in Practice’ (PiP), in an effort to establish better links between its massive cohort of 300 Masters students (no undergrads) and ‘practitioners’ in thinktanks, NGOs etc. So with some […]

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So you’ve written the research report: what else do you need to do to ensure people actually read it?

Remember the old days when you wrote a report, published it (perhaps with some kind of executive summary), did a couple of seminars and then declared victory and moved on? Social media have changed that game almost beyond recognition: to maximize impact, any new report more closely resembles a set of Russian dolls, with multiple […]

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Links I liked

Your weekly excuse to delay reading your Monday morning emails, drawn from last week’s @fp2p tweets Let’s start with Scotland (obvs) Nobody can accuse CNN of not giving it 110% [h/t @DanaHoule]   Hilarious and deeply odd. Taiwanese animated explanation of the vote, featuring a strong candidate for the world’s worst Scottish accent [h/t Alex […]

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Why is economic orthodoxy so resistant to change? The art of paradigm maintenance.

Ever wondered why it’s so hard to shift big institutions (and the economics profession in general) on economic policy, even when events so graphically show the need for change? I’ve just come across a fascinating 2006 paper by Robin Broad, ‘Research, knowledge and the art of ‘paradigm maintenance’: the World Bank’s Development Economics Vice Presidency […]

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Links I liked

Wait, don’t start work – check out this pick of last week’s @fp2p twittercrop instead. Global Median Ages: Niger the youngest (15); Japan/Germany the oldest (46) [H/t Ian Bremmer, Tanja Hichert] If you’re interested in governance, political economy etc, Matt Andrews at Harvard is putting up a blog post, video and powerpoint after each lecture […]

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What can we learn from big advocacy initiatives in the Philippines on education, violence against women, reproductive health and freedom of information?

Ahead of next week’s Thinking and Working Politically seminar, here’s another case study from The Asia Foundation, which has got some impressive advocacy results in the Philippines. Room for Maneuver (book and research brief) examines four social policy reforms to try and draw lessons for advocacy work. They are 1. The successful passage of the […]

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R2P RIP? Painful reflections on a decade of ‘Responsibility to Protect’

Ed Cairns, Oxfam’s senior policy adviser on humanitarian advocacy, bares his soul on whether R2P has a future, or is best consigned to the dustbin of history Nine years ago this month, the UN World Summit endorsed the Responsibility to Protect. But this summer’s bloodshed in Gaza was only the latest conflict to provoke a heated […]

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How to write about development without being simplistic, patronising, obscure or stereotyping

It’s all very well writing for wonks, but what about the poor comms people who have to make all those clever ideas about nuance, context, complexity etc etc accessible to people who don’t spend all day thinking about this stuff? Oxfam America’s Jennifer Lentfer has a good piece on this on her ‘How Matters’ blog, […]

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Links I liked

The usual Monday morning excuse not to start in on your emails. Twitter highlights from last week’s @fp2p feed. What academics are really saying [h/t Conrad Hackett] What happens when you try to give a rich person $2? A nice experiment on donorship, poverty and power [h/t Farida Bena] There were good punch-ups & polemics: […]

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‘Beyond our two minutes’: which international bodies are good/bad at consulting civil society organizations?

Ah yes, death by consultation, the fate that awaits all NGO policy wonks. The international civil society alliance CIVICUS has published ‘Beyond Our Two Minutes’, a useful new report trying to assess the efforts of intergovernmental organizations (UN, World Bank etc) to engage with civil society. It’s a pilot project, developing a scorecard to test […]

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