It's Our Turn to Eat; withering green shoots; the first advanced market commitment; aid and Africa; the BRICs' first summit and dreams of success in Copenhagen: links I liked

Chris Blattman loves ‘It’s Our Turn to Eat’, Michela Wrong’s book on corruption in Kenya

Martin Wolf pours cold water on talk of green shoots and argues that the recession is only just beginning and that policymakers have to stay the course on reflation

Owen Barder hails the first ‘Advanced Market Commitment’ in which aid donors guarantee a market for new drugs aimed at the ‘diseases of poverty’. First up is pneumococcal disease, which kills 1.6 million people in the world a year, the majority of them young children in the developing world. 

Chris Roche of Oxfam Australia muses on the future of aid, plus an eclectic set of links. 

Some useful updates on Africa and aid: From the One Campaign comes its 2009 data report, plus some choice abuse for the Italian leadership from Bob Geldof in the run up to the G8 in Italy. From the Africa Progress Panel, (a great and good group chaired by Kofi Annan, which follows progress on the Gleneagles G8 promises and Africa Commission report of 2005) a good annual overview of developments in the region, including infrastructure, health, and the impact of the global crisis. Lots of thought provoking graphics, including this one showing that the age gap between leaders and led is 43 years in Africa, compared to 16 years in the G8 – (African people are younger and its leaders are older)

The BRICs held their first ever summit, but it went almost unnoticed (in the UK at least) thanks to the upheavals in Iran. Catch up on what they talked about. (The acronym was first dreamt up by Goldman Sachs’ Jim O’Neill in 2001. As the Financial Times noted, this is ‘almost certainly the first multilateral nation bloc to be created by an investment bank’s research analysts and their sales team’).

And finally, Greenpeace plays fantasy football with the Copenhagen climate summit.  Well we can always dream.

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