Robin Hoodies and Robbing Oil Revenues: two fine new youtubes

Here’s the latest youtube treat from Richard Curtis for the Robin Hood Tax campaign (whose Facebook fan club just topped 150,000 people). OK, we oldies recognize Ben Kingsley, but test your yoof credentials by naming the rest of them…….. See here for more considered (if less enjoyable) posts on the subject.

 

Meanwhile Oxfam America’s animated short “Follow the Money” has been selected as one of 16 finalists for YouTube’s DoGooder Nonprofit Video Award

 

And now that you have seen it, click here to VOTE. (Winners will be announced on April 10, so the deadline is today at midnight)

Finally, if you want to learn more, check out Chris Hufstader’s blog about the time he actually tried to follow the money from a gold mining project in Sadiola, Mali.

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Comments

One Response to “Robin Hoodies and Robbing Oil Revenues: two fine new youtubes”
  1. From the video: “It will raise billions and cost ordinary people nothing.”

    I understand that advocacy requires simplification, but do you think we know with certainty that this statement is true? With what probability is it true? How much do we know about the elasticity of financial transactions to taxation when we predict how much it will earn?

    Duncan: Hi Matt, on the incidence question (i.e. distributive impact) this paper http://robinhoodtax.org.uk/files/ReDefine-FTTs-as-tools-for-progressive-taxation-and-improving-market-behaviour.pdf by Sony Kapoor looks at the incidence question and concludes that the FTT would be highly progressive. Rodney Schmidt and others have done some modelling on the elasticity question, and these have been taken into account in the predictions of likely income. All the papers are on the Stamp Out Poverty website, http://www.stampoutpoverty.org/ (under the ‘library’ heading)

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