User fees are bad; India's middle class; disgraced professions; a good bank; Aesop and the Euromeltdown; the Amnesty ad the FT rejected; bad news from Rwanda and mangled lyrics: links I liked

Charging even very small user fees sharply limits access to preventive health care. MIT’s Poverty Action Lab summarizes the evidence Health-Products-v2and comes to an unequivocal  conclusion. Hope everyone’s listening

Does India’s middle class care about poverty and inequality? SCF’s Ben Phillips is hopeful

‘I write to you from a disgraced profession’ (guess which one…..). James Galbraith‘s written statement to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee 

Great (African Development) Bank, shame about the shareholders. CGD’s Todd Moss rates the performance of the ADB as it seeks a threefold capital increase

The Grasshoppers and the Ants: Martin Wolf comes over all Aesop as he sums up the Global Economic Crisis 2.0

The Amnesty ad the FT refused to publish

The dark side of a donor darling: human rights news from Rwanda

And finally, as it’s Friday, some light relief. It’s got nothing to do with development, Oxfam or anything else, but I’ve always been hopeless at understanding song lyrics, so honestly can’t tell what these people are singing. Hat tip for this to an anonymous benefactor (you know who you are KR)

reminds me of the wonderful 80s Maxell advert and its mangling of Desmond Dekker

Subscribe to our Newsletter

You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link in the footer of our emails. For information about our privacy practices, please see our Privacy Policy.

We use MailChimp as our marketing platform. By subscribing, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to MailChimp for processing. Learn more about MailChimp's privacy practices here.

Comments

2 Responses to “User fees are bad; India's middle class; disgraced professions; a good bank; Aesop and the Euromeltdown; the Amnesty ad the FT rejected; bad news from Rwanda and mangled lyrics: links I liked”
  1. While I have no priors on this, I would hesitate to call five data points on 5 different products in 3 different countries (and likely different areas with Kenya) an “unequivocal conclusion.”

  2. There are lies, damned lies and statistics. Using statistics like the Gestapo of long ago will invariably lead to the statistics that can prove any point. If there is a decrease in the demand for services it follows from it being firstly being provided for free, which is a distortion of the market. Secondly, it also gives an indication of either the value that the person places on his/her own or family’s lives, or reflects on the system’s inability to show the benefits derived from using a specific product or service. This is then more a distortion through a lack of education which can be blamed on the researchers conducting the study.

    As stated in the earlier the statistics now says exactly what the Gestapo wants it to say.

    Duncan: Disagree with you Robert (and not just about random references to the Gestapo) – a more plausible (and simpler) explanation is that when you are really poor, it is very hard to find the money to pay fees in hospitals or schools, so you tend to use them less!

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.